Traditional vs. Advanced Framing



on today's video we're going to take a look at two different houses a house built very traditionally friends with normal methods just like we've been doing to the last hundred years and then we're going to go take a look at an advanced frame house a house that uses some new methods some new techniques and even some new materials and we're going to explore the differences between the two and why you might consider going advanced framing for your next build okay first I'm coming to you from a traditionally framed house this one has probably started framing around the 1st of 2017 and this house being framed now really looks like it could have been framed 30 40 maybe even 50 years ago a lot of the techniques on this house have been around for a long time let's look at the details first exterior walls these are 2×4 exterior walls that are on 16 inch on center increments that's pretty standard pretty normal the next thing you'll notice is this outside corner here look how this corner is framed this has a lot of lumber and probably a dead air space but what you're going to notice is there's no way to insulate this corner effectively all the corners of this house are uninsulated the next thing you'll notice on this house is the headers these have traditional 2 by headers this back window for instance this is a 2 by 12 header on the back window so from the window all the way up to the ceiling we've got no insulation just a giant header taking up that space my guess is on this one-story house that if they would have actually engineered that header size we could have gotten a lot smaller and probably gotten some insulation in that space the next thing you'll notice on this house is the jack and king studs that are holding up that window header we've got one king stud that's the long side and then we've got two Jack studs plus we've got a lot of lumber underneath in this corner here so there is basically a huge uninsulated area at the back of this house remember lumber is about 1 r1 per inch so around this whole window at best we've brought probably an r3 or maybe an r4 very little insulation there the next thing you'll notice on the south is where interior walls are mating with outside walls again we've got a dead air space that has no insulation and no good way to insulate that that's very traditional to see but on the other hand I'm going to show you an advanced frame house that uses ladder blocking which is a much better way to get what you need for drywall hanging but also to get some insulation in that space all right guys one last thing here don't be fooled by that green at the base of the house that's just a termite treatment everything you see in here is standard SPF lumber let's contrast this house with an advanced frame house that a friend of mine is building and another section is down so let's pack up and head over there alright now let's have a look at this advanced frame house and let's think about the differences between this one and the traditional frame house that we just left so first the first thing you're going to notice is two by six walls here on 24 inch centers the reason why we want to reduce the lumber overall is because of stud like this two by six is roughly our six but the cavity can be filled with our 19 if we're using bats or maybe our 20 if we're use a blown in or a total fill so if we can reduce those studs without hurting the structure we can get a better r-value for the overall wall next thing you're going to notice on this house let's look at the headers on this house we've got LSL headers that the engineer design specifically for the load so they're not oversized and we pack those the outside of the house so we actually have room for an insulated header very unusual to see that in a traditional houses most traditional houses have wood full depth on the header cavity no insulation in that space let's bring in the overall r-value the wall way down the next thing you'll notice is where those headers are we've got just one stub instead of a traditional King and Jack stud we just have one king stud and we've used a header hanger these are the Simpson hx6 hangers and all that load is getting transferred with just one stud still gives us plenty of wood to install our drywall and our trim as usual but now we've limited one stud and a critical spot for insulation okay next let's talk about exterior corners you know in this advanced frame house we've got to stick to your corners that's given us point in structure but now we're able to run that insulation easily all the way to the outside edge of the wall now we've ladder blocked this one so we can hang drywall traditionally you could also go with a drywall clip so you could eliminate that but I kind of like having the structure for the drywall guys makes everything really easy and that quote unquote normal okay the next thing I want to talk about on this house is we think about headers is look at this gable wall in this house on this back gable we don't have structure so the engineer we verified with him all we need as a single to buy header in this case and again we can insulate now this builder chose to go 2 by 6 on the first floor 2 by 4 walls on the second floor again we can eliminate some of that additional wood really use our resources efficiently and we've got a very well insulated house to begin with now because of this advanced framing the last thing I want to mention on this house is the exterior rigid foam this gray material you're seeing here is actually the back side of this zip our sheathing interesting new product where they've actually bonded poly iso insulation to their zip sheathing this is a half-inch high grade OSB it has this green weather is this to bear on it already and now this foam gets sandwiched on the outside so where we do have stubs we've stopped that thermal bridge and we've actually doubled the insulation value at the stud remember I said earlier a stud on the outside of two-by-six is roughly r6 this insulation here is six point six so now even where that stud is we have an r12 and in our cavity now if we're going to use a blown in our twenty we actually have our 26 here this is going to really increase our insulation value of this house overall remember you're going to want to vary the amount of exterior insulation though based on your climate zone so we're down here in Texas we don't need a whole lot of exterior insulation to meet code but if you're in a northern climate you may want to consider some thicker insulation to meet code in your climate last thought here be sure you talk to an engineer in your local area about what you might use from this video and advanced framing you know this house is being built in Texas I don't have seismic wind or snow loads here so depending on where you're building in the country you may have some different experiences for your house talk to that local engineer we bless this house and we're able to build a fantastic house with these advanced framing techniques and this is going to work in most parts of the country hey thanks for joining me guys be sure you hit that subscribe button below we're posting content twice a week every Tuesday and every Friday and I'd love to have you join me as I talk about how to build a house that's going to last for a couple generations otherwise we'll see you next time on the build show you you

47 Comments

  • leglamps

    April 12, 2019

    Trying to reinvent the wheel.

    Reply
  • Miguel Hernandez

    April 12, 2019

    That advanced framing looks cheap I’ve been framing houses for 10 years now traditionally

    Reply
  • F4TaL Gaming

    April 12, 2019

    This guys a fuckin idiot

    Reply
  • EliteSlayer542

    April 12, 2019

    I'll spend the extra couple bucks on my heating bill thank you very much. This seems cheap and 24" spacing sounds terrible. I already get annoyed with stud spacing whenever I need to instal a shelf, wall mounted TV or any of my SO's Ikea crap.

    Reply
  • Elijah Bernal

    April 12, 2019

    Why does it look he got punch on the eye before going work

    Reply
  • JUNIOR TERAZA

    April 12, 2019

    Tu “ header hanger” nunca será la misma fuerza y firmeza, sólo buscan lo más fasil y rápido, production only

    Reply
  • mr taz Mania devil

    April 12, 2019

    That advanced house is a joke

    Reply
  • Adam Wilson

    April 12, 2019

    What a frigging joke. The second house is simply cutting corners to save the builder money. Bet it costs more than the first too…cause it’s “advanced”

    Reply
  • Adam Wilson

    April 12, 2019

    Lol those outside corners are insulated before sheating

    Reply
  • Nick Haley

    April 12, 2019

    "how to build a house that's gonna last a couple of generations"
    He says that like it's a good thing. Thats only 50 years.
    In the UK i'm regularly working on stuff that's 120 years old and still going strong.

    Reply
  • Red Beard

    April 12, 2019

    Been a framer for 12 years and traditional is the way to go framed the so called advanced way and all that is a reason for lazy ass so called carpenter to hack shit together and call it good???

    Reply
  • stephen spiby

    April 12, 2019

    Drill small holes and inject expansion foam.Quick easy and great insulation.

    Reply
  • Andy Harrison

    April 12, 2019

    Mr. Risinger, what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent video were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone who watched this is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.

    Reply
  • Brian Beddell

    April 12, 2019

    Nothing about this is advanced framing. Call it economical framing that’s fine but they have been doing this type of framing since the 1800s .

    There is a legitimate reason we use 16” o.c. And proper corners. California corners do not help one bit for backing on your exterior siding and trim.

    Reply
  • Brian Beddell

    April 12, 2019

    Obviously doesn’t work in Snow Load Conditions. And wood counts as insulation

    Reply
  • randall byrd

    April 12, 2019

    Well I take the r value deficit over the strength of your flimsy walls. Osb exterior sheathing, you would think with all the lumber you saved on you would at least but a better sheathing than a sponge

    Reply
  • William Kirkwood

    April 12, 2019

    Been 24” oc in Scotland for years and don’t have any problems

    Reply
  • Marlowe Parks

    April 12, 2019

    In the Advanced framing, can I use one top plate for the walls on the first and second floor? I saw it in a book like that.

    Reply
  • brussell639

    April 12, 2019

    What part of Texas do you live/build in? In my part of texas, it gets fucking hot and cold. Spring/Summer/partial Fall sees temps in high 90s to low 100s. The couple of months of winter gets below freezing and can stay there. As a matter of fact, 2 days ago it was a very comfortable 70°, now its 25°. That's the texas I live in. I need my heat to stay inside when it's like it is right now.

    Reply
  • dshchurov

    April 12, 2019

    Vapor 'transparency' must increase from inside out. Your polyester is a no-way barrier for vapor I think. And it's at a cold side. Your metal header holders are a 'highway' for cold temperature. You've removed one wooden plank and replaced it with one metal piece. Yep.

    Reply
  • CD ROD

    April 12, 2019

    He says he consulted with the engineer about it.
    I am sure he did,these days, engineers are 20 something years old with no experience at all in the field.

    Reply
  • b mel

    April 12, 2019

    Ever heard of steel?

    Reply
  • Peter Pann

    April 12, 2019

    Hi Matt, love the shows, I hope you will be able to do a show displaying some ecological materials that are not filled with chemicals.

    Reply
  • Kelly Smith

    April 12, 2019

    What are you going to attach your outside corner trim to ??? Latter backing isnt that great for sheet rock .and you have to have 2 trimmers under each side of the headers .4ft. and over .also some of the most missed backing in houses is curtain rod backing , so full headers are great as well

    Reply
  • LoveBANFF1974

    April 12, 2019

    This is such a lousy way of framing.

    Reply
  • Troll napf

    April 12, 2019

    My house was build in 1901 with studs 24” oc, guess they were already pretty advanced back in the day.

    Reply
  • JFranco

    April 12, 2019

    Also for electrical romex. Go look at studies on romex. For high quality homes don’t install that trash. Yeah it meets code but it’s the minimum.

    Reply
  • bjkjoseph

    April 12, 2019

    No good.

    Reply
  • Gibleticus

    April 12, 2019

    Marketing and advertising has come a long way

    Reply
  • Caguama Time

    April 12, 2019

    Engineered homes are dumb as fuck

    Reply
  • Midnights & Mornings

    April 12, 2019

    Im just got out of carpentry school and heard about this advanced framing. To me, it seems like crap. All they are doing is cutting corners and cost. Hey, thats their business….but for me, ill stick to traditional stick framing. We have expanding foam insulation now buddy….

    Reply
  • Jason Warner

    April 12, 2019

    Again you are an idiot. You so called advanced framing aka as a hack job. Will not pass code in most places. Let alone be a strong house. Sure the 2×6 framing is great. We did that as far back as the 90's in Ohio. We were never stupid enough to do them 24" oc though. Second corners and wall ends do not have a dead air space. They are insulated during framing. Geez how stupid can a so called contractor be? He is another problem. Almost all code call for 1 king stud 1 Jack stud and 1 short stud under the window. Any opening over 4 foot calls for 1 king stud 2 Jack studs and 1 short stud. Also 2×6 wall headers are box headers filled with insulation. If this is what they call a qualified contractor in Texas. It isn't any wonder I see so many jobs here that would never have passed inspection even back in the 90's in Ohio.

    Reply
  • Scott Fehnel

    April 12, 2019

    Most of these comments are narrow minded, " because that's how we always did it " thinking. Most people in the trades have no clue about new technology and what is really necessary to build a strong, energy efficient structure. Do some research, better yet try building a house , or even a shed with this new technology. You might be surprised, I was. Stop resisting, pull your head out of the sand. And while we're at it stop already with the fiberglass insulation. This will be our generations asbestos, a horrible product that is never installed correctly, even by the best installers.

    Reply
  • plain denim

    April 12, 2019

    Advanced framing? All you care about is insulation

    Reply
  • Ox In The Shop

    April 12, 2019

    Hey Matt.
    So I am about to build a new house and I have just ran across your channel. Do you have a video on the cost difference between traditional and advanced framing. Looking to build a 2000 sqft ranch on a full basement in Georgia. Channel to find your channel very useful info.

    Reply
  • Michael MIlls

    April 12, 2019

    I've seen houses build over a hundred years ago withstand hurricane after hurricane with a single metal strap anywhere and new home with all the 'new technology' blow away in a small hurricane. Seems to me we should be studying there methods and why they work.

    Reply
  • Andrew Gray

    April 12, 2019

    That wiring behind you is bugging the piss outta me

    Reply
  • Gray

    April 12, 2019

    Yea I'd take the traditional framing.

    Reply
  • Gray

    April 12, 2019

    Am I the only one who likes a little draft in the house. These over insulated homes seem uncomfortable. Is it just me?

    Reply
  • Theodore Vegh

    April 12, 2019

    "Building Science and Art" by Theodore Alexander Vegh

    Reply
  • Spence Cowaert

    April 12, 2019

    I know absolutely nothing about building, but I wouldn’t want that new house here in Florida during a hurricane.

    Reply
  • Dmitriy Gula

    April 12, 2019

    Old farts are getting triggered! ?.
    Awesome videos Matt.

    Reply
  • Techno Tard

    April 12, 2019

    Using the word like "Advance Framing" is a kin to calling lunatic anarchist liberals, "Progressive". Thank you for making it a point for me to take a stud finder on my next home purchase to avoid the 24" cheap house.

    Reply
  • Chandler Rogers

    April 12, 2019

    Kill the cameraman

    Reply
  • Lou Vig

    April 12, 2019

    Not structurally sound plus the foam attached to the sheeting makes for no lateral bracing. I didn’t see any diagonal let in bracing in the walls and at 24 o/c it wouldn’t do much on this house anyway.

    Reply
  • Garrison Jones

    April 12, 2019

    I just don't believe that type of framing could be as strong as traditional. Such bullshit!

    Reply
  • Peter Kroeker

    April 12, 2019

    This man is teaching me more than my boss did the last 3 years

    Reply

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