Testing the Wobble Dado Blade – woodworkweb



today we're going to go retro hello everyone Colin Conan here for woodwork web a few videos ago I made a video on using a dado blade and we're not going to do that again but what we are going to do we're going to look at something called a wobble wheel and this is a kind of dado blade that you used to be able to buy many years ago I I have not been able to find a manufacturer of this lately but I see these things that garage sales and swap meets yard sales all sorts of places and every time I look at what I they're so cheap they're like five or ten dollars I keep thinking I should buy one and then I remember that I already have one at home that I don't use that often so today we're going to have a really good look at some old technology and see exactly what it's like most of you will already be familiar with a dado blade and this is called a stacking dataset and the way works is you've got a regular size wheel on the outside then you have something called chippers that go inside and you could put a number of chippers in there and make it thicker or thinner depending on how deep the data was you want to put and then you put another full-sized wheel on the back so you end up with something that looks like this a wide looking table saw blade now there is another thing and as I said I cannot find if anybody's still manufacturing these but there's tons of them sold and there's tons of them available I see them all the time used and this is something called a wobble wheel and I'm going to do a close-up now so you can see exactly what this thing looks like this is what a wobble wheel looks like it's a single blade but the difference that this has is the center of this blade pivots and when it pivots it means that the blade itself when you turn the blade like this now let's turn it like this this is how it's going to be cutting and we'll use this for the Arbor of a saw when you turn it oh this pivots so when you get it in your table saw is there it's level and when you spin it see how see how that blade spins like that it it wobbles back and forth and when it does that I will put it in the saw so you can see it it actually makes a dado since that this isn't popular anymore and one of the one of the reasons is and it's anecdotal so I don't know but that's what we're going to look at today one of the reasons is people who have these have said that when you're cutting a dado because it it cuts it does this when it's cutting and it doesn't take a genius to figure out that you would end up getting depending on how wide the cut is you you will get a little bit of a crown bottom on your table cuts and and that may in fact be true but the real question is is how bad is that is it is it something that you need to be concerned about and that's what we're going to look at today and we're going to cut some dedos with this and we're look tat so we'll see just how bad this crowning is maybe it's something that you can live with and you know maybe you could pick up but I used wobble wheel like this for a few bucks until you can afford you know these things are up in the hundreds of dollars you know typically over a hundred dollars so there's pretty big difference in price there so let's have a look at this and see what a wobble wheel actually does so here we are at the table saw and I've set this in I haven't put the knot on here yet so this isn't clamped yet but I wanted to give you a better idea see how when you spin this see how that wobbles back and forth like that and if you change the settings on here and I'll do a close-up of this so you can see what that looks like like this and spin it see how true it is now and that's because let's have a close-up let's look at the adjustments on here so there's what the inner workings of this look like and right here move that into the picture right there there's a little notch you can barely see it and it's pointing to a number so all you have to do is rotate this number and that starts off at little less than an eighth and as you rotate it around and this is where it's that the wheel is near perfect it's it's very true but as you rotate it around like this it goes all the way around – there's three quarters of an inch and that's about what we're going to be using a numbers are a little hard to read but that's three quarters of an inch and that goes up to what is it looks like about fifteen sixteenths all the way up to there but this little notch here and these numbers are not it's hard to tell exactly where it needs to be so we're going to start off at three quarters of an inch right there because that's the material that we're cutting there it is they're just some MDF so that we can see exactly what this looks like so there's what it looks like when it's going to be spinning and I'm just going to put the nut on and finish setting this up and we'll speed this up so that you don't have to see this all going to be our first test cut we're just testing to see how wide if this dado this is the piece we're trying to fit in and let's test to see how wide that day okay so we're quite a bit short so we'll need to take it all apart and disassemble that that's a little it's a little looser than I like I think I'll take it out make one more adjustment just to bring it in a little bit tighter it may not be perfect but we'll get a little bit closer absolute tight fit now let's run our these are just our tests let's actually run a strip now okay let's cut our finished piece now okay let's get a nice tight look at that now so there's that joint and you can see for yourself what that looks like it looks like there might be a little bit of a gap at the top there it's tight at the bottom and it looks like it now looks like there's even a gap at the top there it's put a little bit of pressure on there or the clamp to see what that does so there we are we've put a clamp on there and it's definitely tight at the bottom they're hard to say it doesn't look like it's tight at the bottom there and there's a little bit of a might be a little bit of an arc in there but I don't think it's depending what you're doing I don't think I think that's pretty acceptable in there for for most things that's our look today at the wobble wheel and if you didn't know what that was now you'll know what that is look if you've already got a stacking dataset you're golden if you have nothing for cutting dedos and you see these at thrift stores garage sales flea markets you can usually pick these up for like five or ten bucks they're really cheap it looks like it does a pretty decent job yeah there's a little bit of fiddling around but you know for for the thus off of the price it's a good place to at least start I'll put some pictures on wood or web some close-up pictures of the joint so you can see that and some better quality stills and before I go I want to remind you if you haven't already subscribed to us there will be a subscribe in the section right after this we'll put a link to our dado video and remember to like us on facebook follow us on twitter i'm colin cadet 4 woodwork web you

26 Comments

  • Safe Line Fleet

    April 14, 2019

    We could make a slight radius on the mating piece, maybe a few strokes of 80-120 grit sand paper on a block, to try and knock down the edges a bit, putting in a slight radius that would closely, if not exactly match the curvature of the dado blade. This will surely bring down the gap in the middle of the slot, making for better appearance and a better glue joint fit. Just loud thinking as one possible solution to overcome the main issue with this design.

    Reply
  • Scott O,Donahoe

    April 14, 2019

    Took the bearings on my radial arm saw out on two sets of stair case runners ! Wobble speaks for its self !

    Reply
  • Amjad Mughal

    April 14, 2019

    oh its good idea .i have done before 2 year s thax.

    Reply
  • Diamondblade2008

    April 14, 2019

    Please excuse my ignorance when I ask this, but what I would like to know is WHY a wobble dado blade somehow produces a dado with a slightly 'curved' bottom. As far as I know with a wobble dado blade; yes I know it moves side to side to cut the wide groove (dado) but surely the height of the blade doesn't change as the height of the cutting depth is set prior to the cut being made? So how on earth does a wobble dado blade produces a slightly 'curved' cut? I know nothing about woodworking so please don't make fum of me when I ask this question.

    Reply
  • Robert Caudill

    April 14, 2019

    I recently found one of these blades at a yard sale, after all the tools I bought $5 a box it cost me about $.50. My arbor is not long enough on my table saw.

    Reply
  • Fred Zenz

    April 14, 2019

    I picked up a brand new, never used today at Habitat for Humanity for $5.00! I can’t wait to try it out!

    Reply
  • Dorian Wiskow

    April 14, 2019

    Wouldn’t it be simpler to just use a dial indicator to measure the ‘width’?

    Reply
  • new modern home productions

    April 14, 2019

    Wow

    Reply
  • TGOTR

    April 14, 2019

    Well, that Gap created by the blade would just get filled in with glue. Irwin still makes wobble blades I think, last I saw. They make thinner ones for saws that have short arbors.

    Reply
  • Lemurai

    April 14, 2019

    Not sure where the anecdote came from about the wobble blades, used them for years with zero problems, but I also never entertained rumors or water cooler chat either. Work, work and work was the only focus when I set foot in my shop. Less chat =‘s more money.

    Reply
  • Lone Wolf

    April 14, 2019

    As for the little bit of crown … makes a nice space for glue. For the price, I'll buy 10 !! One for each size I may need !! Leave it set up and marked !! DONE !!

    Reply
  • George Sarkisian

    April 14, 2019

    I have a 1950s model wobble wheel from Shopsmith/Magna. This was my dad's Shopsmith Mark V but I am using it in my retirement. He died a long time ago so I can't ask him some specific questions. I have a sleeve that fits on the arbor shaft and dado center hole. I can't figure out how to secure the dado to the arbor shaft. There does not seem to be any tie down little screws to screw into the flat part of the arbor. I also can't figure out how to secure the dado blade itself to a specific width. I can adjust it with the special allen wrench but there is not a way to keep that width constant. I am not the smartest guy but I keep looking at the setup and reading the manuals but I can't figure this out. Can you help me please?

    Reply
  • Robert Birchmeyer

    April 14, 2019

    Thanks for this video. I purchased five of these over time. Each like brand new. These things never seem to get much use. Probably because of the fiddle factor they get set to the side in the tool arsenal. I set up each one to a different size and used lock-tite on the dial. I just grab a preset wobble for the size I need and cut away. You can find these everywhere for about 5-10 dollars each.

    Reply
  • John Knisley

    April 14, 2019

    Does anyone know if these would work on a jobsite saw like a Dewalt 745? I know you can't use a dado stack on those saws, but this would be nice if you could use it!

    Reply
  • Moonwolf71

    April 14, 2019

    If you don't like it clean it up with a chisel

    Reply
  • Stephen Richie

    April 14, 2019

    Haven’t used mine in years. That’s why. Routers are easier to set up and and more precise.

    Reply
  • I Paid

    April 14, 2019

    So……. not worth it? Four-seven passed with a regular blade and it’s good every time

    Reply
  • Aeneas

    April 14, 2019

    Hi Colin, I just bought a Freud 208S set from the US, (still the best place in the world to buy woodworking gear). It should arrive in the UK in about a week. Happy days. Love your vids!

    Reply
  • Woodgrain Owings Mills

    April 14, 2019

    Grizzly sells them. Oldham 7" wobble model G2793.

    Reply
  • andrea vallotto

    April 14, 2019

    Have you ever notice that your blade is hitting everywhere?!

    Reply
  • Stuckey 3223

    April 14, 2019

    Never have that much trouble with my wobble. Antone with common sense and wood working experience would not have to make that many adjustments.

    Reply
  • Kathy Winn

    April 14, 2019

    I would love to find one at a yard sale. I would definitely use it!

    Reply
  • Cristi Pop

    April 14, 2019

    Freud leitz the best ?⚰?o NO No NO dont iuz???

    Reply
  • Jerry Friedman

    April 14, 2019

    My dad had one and used it on his radial arm saw…
    Exactly why is this considered any more dangerous that a stack or a single blade for that matter?
    Oh, thanks for the vid – Yes intro was a bit long…

    Reply
  • cgrant26

    April 14, 2019

    The first time I used one of these it was almost terrifying watching that blade wobble. 20 years later and I'm still using them. They just work.

    Reply
  • LitlClutch

    April 14, 2019

    Isn't this something you could do with a router?

    Reply

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