Photographing a Real Estate Interior with Bright Windows

Photographing a Real Estate Interior with Bright Windows


Hello, this is Stuart from the Photomatix
team, and in this tutorial I’m going to show you a basic technique
for taking bracketed photos. What we’re going to do now is
take a series of photographs, with the intention of seeing both the interior of the room and what’s outside the window. First of all, turn on all the lights in the room: the ceiling lights, up-lighters, floor lamps or any architectural lights you may find. Next, set the ISO to 400. Now we need to select a suitable aperture:
how much light we let into the lens. For good sharpness in your photos
with a wide angle lens, I suggest f/8. Now select APERTURE PRIORITY and
make sure your flash is switched off. The common abbreviations for APERTURE PRIORITY are the letters ‘AV’ or ‘A’. Now aim your camera to a point in the room
which has an average brightness level. That is to say, not directly at
the darkest area with shadows, nor at the brightest, like the window. Make a note of the shutter speed. What you see here is just an example as your shutter speed may be a different value. Now switch the camera to MANUAL MODE and check that the shutter speed didn’t change. If it did, then change it back to what you
saw after aiming at an average brightness. In your camera’s settings menu,
find the ‘AEB’ function. This is AUTOMATIC EXPOSURE BRACKETING. If you are unfamiliar with the AEB functions of your camera, then refer to its user manual. Set the Exposure Compensation
of your camera to + and – 2 EV, if it supports a 2 EV spacing. Otherwise, set it to the maximum EV spacing it allows. Depending on your camera model, you may now see 3 markers on your display: 1 marker at -2, 1 in the middle on 0, and the last marker at +2. These represent the 3 shots you are going to take; 1 underexposed, 1 normal and 1 overexposed. Some cameras are capable of taking more than 3 bracketed photographs at once: some 5 or 7. If so, use the maximum allowed by your camera. Before we take the required shots, switch
your camera to CONTINUOUS SHOOTING mode. Mount your camera on a tripod if you have one. If you don’t, look for a steady surface
you can rest the camera on. Next, frame the shot, check the focus, then press and hold the shutter button until the bracketed photos are taken. So, there you have it: 3 bracketed photographs, ready to import into Photomatix. If you haven’t downloaded Photomatix Essentials RE yet, you can do so by clicking on the link on screen. And one final tip: if you are using a tripod, which is always recommended, then try using the timer function to fire the shutter … … or, even better, use a remote shutter release cable. The more stable the camera during the shooting process, the better the results.

7 Comments

  • Marc Philibert residential

    February 11, 2017

    Perfect explanation. Cheers! I've been using Photomatix with my 6D for three years now and it beats me how I still cant get the same results as my R/E photographer who uses the same gear as mine! I just cant get a bright enough picture where the exterior also shows clearly. Although I like the filters offered in Photomatix I just want a clean/realistic shot. Is the trick to have off camera flash incorporated?

    Reply
  • bas75252

    March 3, 2017

    Do I use JPG or RAW format?

    Reply
  • bas75252

    March 3, 2017

    How does your software differ from Photoshop's Lightroom > Merge > HDR?

    Reply
  • bas75252

    March 3, 2017

    For real estate shooting would you recommend a crop sensor camera such as Canon 80D or a full frame such as the 6D?

    Reply
  • Skybound Videos

    May 9, 2017

    Why not just use an ISO of 100 and use a slower shutter speed in order to reduce the amount of noise?

    Reply
  • Zycie w Californii

    June 26, 2017

    does sony a600 has this metering feature? I can not find it

    Reply
  • luka zupie

    March 27, 2019

    7brackets?? Why?:o

    Reply

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