How to Soundproof Ceilings Between Floors



hey in this video we're going to address soundproofing between floors on a previous video I talked about soundproofing the entire room and preventing noise from escaping like from a home theater you know making sure the rest of the house is nice and quiet while you're cranked up and having your fun now what if you want the reverse well what are some of the examples in my life I had once the people living above me their kitchen was directly above my bedroom and I couldn't carpet upstairs because it was already tiled now let's say you for example are finishing your basement and you want a nice office or a nice quiet reading room and upstairs is nice hardwood floors you don't want to cover that either so what do you do you dress it from underneath now there's two types of noise pollution I like to call it a sound okay there is like airborne noises which are obviously you know come through the air talking music what-have-you there's also impact noise which is basically vibrations through this joist in the wood you know easiest example if someone's upstairs either walking or dancing nothing's going to prevent that unless you do these following steps first of all the airborne noise we're going to use raxil safe and sound okay that is going to prevent any music any singing any screaming kids what-have-you secondly as I said the impact noise that is caused by physics shall we say people walking on the floor vibrates the floor vibrates the joist vibrates your drywall so to lessen the vibration we're going to use this this is called a resilient channel alright as you can see it's going to be almost independent from the joist you're going to tack it into the joist itself this is going to float independently and then finally you got your drywall and what you're going to do is you're going to screw the drywall into your resilient channel which is attached to your joists so by following these steps in attacking noise pollution two ways you should have a much quieter and a much more pleasant reading room alright so let's start soundproofing now the first thing you want to do step one is you want to look for any holes that might be in the ceiling that where plumbing or wires might go through such as this one here alright but that's an easy simple fix all you do is you take an acoustic ceiling like this you fill in the hole like that and we're done once you've filled all the holes you are ready to install the rock cell safe and sound all right now that we have sealed up all the holes with the acoustic ceiling it is now time to put up the rock so safe and sound bat now remember this is not thermal insulation this does what the name implies safe and sound it stops airborne sound from passing but the bonus feature is that because this product is made out of rock and slag which is a recycled metal it will not burn and it will not smoke that's the added bonus easy to install you just insert it you compress it and release now when we finished doing all choice then we'll put up the resilient channel and the drywall okay so remember we are combating two types of noises we're airborne noise and impact noise now the rock cells safe and sound should cover the air borne noise because it's doing what it's supposed to do but again we talked about impact noises and what is that that's when people of us upstairs are walking and the vibrations come through all the joists now in order to come back that we put this up this is called the resilient channel I put the first one up and I've marked the second one where I'm going to want it at 16 to center and so line it up there line it up there okay and we just put it up with drywall screws all right now once the rest are all up at 6 in the center that gives us our basically our vibration barrier shall we say and then we're ready for the drywall now when putting up the drywall there's really no point in putting it up against the joists because that defeats the purpose of what we are trying to achieve what you want to do now is you want to put the drywall onto the resilient channels themselves such as this also because this is a metal product you want to use fine threaded drywall screws there you go well let's attach the back one as well so remember seal the holes with an acoustic sealant put in rocks all safe and sound add the resilient channels and you're ready for drywall and you should have a nice quiet comfortable reading room

11 Comments

  • Andres Villanueva

    April 14, 2019

    Does it matter which side of the rockwool is facing the ceiling ? Or will both sides do the job

    Reply
  • atibbo

    April 14, 2019

    I have engineered floor joists, will this work?

    Reply
  • Peter

    April 14, 2019

    This material makes little difference, Whatever rating some fraudulent organization gives them, sure shows they have a hand in hand with the manufacturer to rip people off. I spent thousands of dollars and soundproofed my house, it's almost like without it. Since when stone wastes has been a sound proofing material. Garbage

    Reply
  • Robert Evans

    April 14, 2019

    No breathing protection when installing the batts of insulation?

    Reply
  • JERCHROME

    April 14, 2019

    Does this work in a drop down ceiling?

    Reply
  • David Paribello

    April 14, 2019

    I have 2×6 floor joists with 6" ducts running through them. Any suggestions on how to sound insulate along those runs?

    Reply
  • chesire cat

    April 14, 2019

    What about moisture? Don't we need barriers for air flow?

    Reply
  • Hunter Block

    April 14, 2019

    Does this work without drywall on the ceiling, I'm in a basement and on a budget

    Reply
  • Larry Tate

    April 14, 2019

    does quiet rock sound proof much better than 5/8 drywall?

    Reply
  • Pat Brennan

    April 14, 2019

    would it matter if the safe and sound is at the top of the gap, against the ply wood floor?

    Reply
  • OJOM Nesir

    April 14, 2019

    rock what? safe and sound. it looks almost like rock wool but couldn't hear what he called it.

    Reply

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