How To Restore Headlights PERMANENTLY ( Better Than a BRAND NEW Headlight )



hey how's it going guys today I'm going to show you how to permanently restore yellowing headlights fast and easy yellowing headlights is something very common in casts and not only do they look bad but they also have a very poor light output on the road at night what happens is this lens on the headlight is made of polycarbonate plastic and even though you can't see it this comes with the UV protective coating from the factory overtime decoding wears off and then while you're driving and leave the car outside in bright sunlight the UV rays coming from the Sun is breaking there and the poly Kevin instruction the lens so the color of the lens goes from transparent yellow over time this gets even worse and starts to look like this headlights look this bed can be restored like this but it has to be done quickly because over time the damage can spread deep into the lens and create little cracks known as cry scenes like you see in this headlight right here all the time these cracks get bigger and destroy the lens so you can had to buy a new headlight which could be expensive and that's why you need to restore your headlights before it's too late and the restoration process I'm going to show you only has three steps starting with the first step even arrange the headlight and the surrounding area using a microfiber towel to remove any dirt then dry the headlight so we can move the step 2 which is removing the top layer of yellow plastic on the lens with some abrasives so I have some cutting compound car polish and metal polish which a liquid abrasives and some sand papers which are dry abrasives all these products contain aluminium oxide as the abrasive agent in different amounts up to 5% in college up to 10% in compound up to 25% in metal polish and up to 100% in sand papers but with different grid sizes higher the number finding the great choice the reason I showed you all this is because for storing your headlights to the brand new condition is all about choosing the right polish and the right sandpaper so for headlights like this it is best to go with 600 grit followed by 1500 grit followed by 3000 grit also it is best to wrap the sandpaper around the foam backing pad so you can put the uniform pressure on the latest is sanding and if you held girl then he can go to the headlight polishing kit like this so you get a backing plate for the drill a wool pad a foam pad and you have your sand papers 243 2600 800 1200 1500 2000 and 3000 so that is there if you want alright first your mask of the surrounding body panels using some masking tape so you wouldn't damage the paint on those panels while sanding then spray some water on the lens and on the sandpaper and start sanding it is best to do this ending in one direction like here I'm doing horizontal with overlapping passes to cover the entire area of the lens spray water as you need and keep sanding with light to medium pressure on the sandpaper when the car of the water running down the lens turn from yellow to sort of milky white wipe the lens any can see the yellow in plastic is gone but now there's a uniform white haze on the lens these are sanding scratches from the 600 grit sandpaper he had remotely so now at the 1500 grit and start sanding again this time instead of going horizontal you can go vertical so you can remove the horizontal scratches a little easier once you get over the entire lens wipe the lens again and now you have an even fire haze from the 1500 grit it's kind of hard to see so now get the 3000 great and do this one more time in the horizontal strokes to remove the vertical scratches like that and you're ready for the compound for this you can use a microfiber towel if you do this by hand or the wool pad if you are using the drill I'm gonna go with the drill because it is much quicker so get some compound on the pad and then remove the tape and start buffing you know maintain a consistent Spade with a uniform pressure on the pad while keeping the pad flat against the headlight and keep the pad moving to avoid heat buildup and burning the plastic cover the entire area with horizontal overlapping passes and then switch to vertical passes and cover the entire area again after the compound you can wipe the lens and start from there but I'm gonna go one extra step I'm gonna switch to the foam pad and is a little bit of polish to bring back the factory shine this is completely optional but this brings up that mirror shine you see on a brand new headlight all right I'm gonna wipe the lens and this is exactly what I'm talking about I mean here's the before and here's the after the clarity is back just like in a brand new headlight so that's how you restore headlights with very bad yellow beam using sand papers but for headlights like this with only minor yellowing you can skip all the sanding work and start out with the compound so I'm gonna do this one real quick no sanding just compound although any good plastic polish will do so just get some compound on the pad and start buffing and buffing and buffie until the headlight starts to look really clean and then wipe the headlight I'm also gonna need some isopropyl alcohol to remove any leftover compound and that is a brand new looking headlight so now you can move the step three which is applying a protective coating on the headlight to keep the headlight from yellowing again and I'm going to show you five counting options so you could choose the one that makes more sense to you first you could use UV hard-code this is the most commonly used product occurring on headlights at the factory but this only comes in commercial quantities and you need to have professional grade spray gun and a compressor set up to use this you also need a UV heat lamp you've had in this one the headlight so as you can tell this is too expensive for most people at home and this only lasts about five years so this option is not the option for me second you could use an aftermarket headlight coating these coatings achieved by comparing om style coating and they come in spray cans you just spray a thin coat on let the coating dry then apply a second coat and you're done this is actually a good option but these coatings only last about a year so this option is also not the option for me Ted you could use a clear coat clickers come in cheap rattle tails like this acrylic they occurred and they only last few years before they start to peel that's why common factor is to take liquor on casts which is suppose in clicker mixed with hardness because they provide no hardness chip and scratch resistance then acrylic records they do come in rattle cans but the manufacturers do not advise using these on headlights and they make special clay code for headlights with special primers to go with it even though these turkey clickers can last a long time car manufacturers never use clicker on headlights and one of the reasons is refraction of light light changes its speed and direction when going through different mediums that's why a pencil in the world looks like his bang or an image behind a glass of water looks like it's realist or images looks bigger through magnifying glass regular vehicles have a higher refractive index than headlight coating so I'm gonna spray some clicker on this headlight lens here like that and now I'm gonna place a light behind the lens as you can see the light is going through the bay lens without any Distortion press and move the light onto the side with clear coat see how we lose the sharpness of the light because of the refraction this can reduce the range of visibility of the headlight so this is by far the best option and definitely not the option for me the fourth option you have is to use headlight covers these cameras fit right over your headlight and they provide good protection from UV light and rock chips but they leave a gap around the headlight for cooling purposes and I often see these edges turn yellow over time because of that and personally I don't like the look of these so this option is also not the option for me and that brings us unto my fifth option which is installing a headlight protection film these films generally last about five years and the best thing is this doesn't get binded under the lens like a coating so when this goes bad he is remove the bad film and install a new one you don't have to register the lens and that makes this the old permanent way to restore your headlights so now it starts to make sense why this is of rather expensive option at car dealerships so this is by far the best option for me and here's what you need to install the film you need your razor blade a small squeegee the heat gun or a hairdryer a spray bottle with some distilled water and some dishwashing liquid or isopropyl alcohol depending on the film you're using alright first you clean the lens to remove any leftover polish soapy water is good for this but isopropyl alcohol is better you also want to clean your hands as well otherwise you're gonna leave fingerprints on the film then spray down the lens and filled with water place the film over the lens then starts going from one corner to the other corner along the center of the headlight that way you can push all the wrinkles to the edges after that you can start squeezing out the water in short strokes if the film is bunching up around the curves they're not trying to flatten it down with the squeegee instead you lift up the film missed it down with some water use the heat gun to warm the film very lightly and then stretch the film around the curves and then use short strokes until you get rid of all the wrinkles this could be little hard but totally doable at home and if you see some moisture under the film that you can't remove don't worry because they evaporate through the film in few days because this is a breathable material and also very thin so this wouldn't affect the heat dissipation from the headlight needed so once you're done you get your razor blade and trim the excess film on the edge then work out all the holes one last time and check this out this looks amazing I mean here's the before and here's the after now this headlight is predicted from yellowing fading and also from getting rock sheets for the years to come and that wraps up my final step on restoring yellowing headlights permanently so leave a comment down below let me know what you think and if you're wondering where to buy all these products are used they are in the description as always if you liked the video press the like button to see more DIY videos just like this one click on the junky DIY guy logo to subscribe to my channel and I'll see you in the next one

33 Comments

  • Junky DIY guy

    April 14, 2019

    HI ALL, For those who like to go with my 4th option – You can use clear coat if you want, It is a cheap and a reasonable alternative option for the price. I was explaining the reason why car manufacturers don’t use clear coat, with a demonstration. That demonstration is only to explain how refraction works on clear coat due to its higher RI, like i showed with a water bucket and a pencil and two more examples. Because clear coats tend to have an orange peel effect, you can get a little distorted light output. Combined with the higher refractive index of clear coat, this can be intensified even more. That’s why @7.43 i mentioned to wet sand the lens to get rid of any orange peel so you can minimise any noticeable distortion of the light output. This video is about restoring headlights permanently. As this car is getting a heavy sun exposure which you can tell by the peeling factory clear coat on the bumper near the headlight, ( https://www.instagram.com/p/BqZ1EA2AfrY/ ) ( https://www.instagram.com/p/BrwneLOBSBb/ ) clear coat is clearly not a permanent solution for these headlights. Removing peeling clear coat is harder than removing a headlight coating when it comes to restore the lens again and clear coat is the only non optical grade product among the 5 options and it has the least clarity. And since clear coat doesn't get bonded onto a highly polished surface like a headlight lens as well as it does on a metal surface, in most cases, you have to roughen up the lens prior to apply cleat coat to stop the clear coat from peeling prematurely and this can further intensify the distortion of the light simply because a roughened up surface create a diffused refraction and this cannot be restored even if you wet sand the lens. That is why the clear coat is the worst option for me among those 5 options. So in this case, i prefer the protection film over the clear coat and all the other coatings because like i mentioned, it doesn't get bonded onto the lens like clear coat or any other coating so in a matter of few minutes i can easily remove and replace the film should the film goes bad in the future which it will and when that happens i won't have to restore the lens all over again, plus the film has the highest optical clarity right out of the box ( you know what i mean if you've ever seen a tinted car window ) and gives me superb chip protection as well. But if you want to use clear coat, you can use a good clear coat and it is completely up to you . That's why i showed you guys 5 common options. i picked mine so you have to pick yours depending on your budget, climate you live in, how long you gonna keep the car for, and what you gonna use the car for (Eg: headlights covers are ideal if you do a lot of road trips as you get good protection from rock chips) . And for those who're wondering why a genuine headlight is so expensive, check this out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoBfqvSZN7c

    Reply
  • Ray Lat

    April 14, 2019

    Just use toothpaste. Thats the ticket.

    Reply
  • joos Koot van

    April 14, 2019

    Scrutinious, complete, informative and viewable. It has it all: Thank you.

    Reply
  • Marcie Willis

    April 14, 2019

    That was Amazing…Thank you!

    Reply
  • Abigail Philips

    April 14, 2019

    Great vid ?…subbed

    Reply
  • Diana Q.

    April 14, 2019

    Wow ur good! Geez

    Reply
  • Joshua Colon

    April 14, 2019

    Excellent and very thorough video. Thank you!

    Reply
  • rdubby

    April 14, 2019

    Should’ve just changed your blinker fluid.

    Reply
  • lalo 26

    April 14, 2019

    Toothpaste will clean your lights

    Reply
  • Alex Povolotski

    April 14, 2019

    Wowsy!

    Reply
  • DMYD Anes

    April 14, 2019

    I hope you get 1 million subscribers. Your videos are well put together…

    Reply
  • Sharkie1717

    April 14, 2019

    Absolutely amazing, such a high level of quality information, and very thorough. You are a legend Sir. Respect.

    Reply
  • Dougal McRae

    April 14, 2019

    Wow 10/10 for your video 🙂

    Reply
  • mykalimba

    April 14, 2019

    3:55 Is there a reason to remove the masking tape as this point? Wouldn't you want to prevent the compounding and polishing of the adjacent painted surfaces?

    Reply
  • Banjos and Robots

    April 14, 2019

    I used the 4th option when I did this, but with one difference. I used Rust Oleum triple thick glaze as my coating. It is normally meant for glazing pottery so it is very durable, UV resistant and non-yellowing. It does spray on thick, so I sanded off the orange peel and buffed with the rubbing compound. It does have a slight refraction change but this does not hurt anything. After 5 years there is no yellowing or clouding.

    Reply
  • gojoey246

    April 14, 2019

    Thank you I loved your video it was very informative and creative once again thank you great job!!!

    Reply
  • Zane Rudd

    April 14, 2019

    Just add some blinker fluid. Easy.

    Reply
  • 00301200

    April 14, 2019

    what an excellent …excellent video . This guy is amazing at explaining things very clearly !

    Reply
  • Glenn Springthorpe

    April 14, 2019

    Fab instructions. My Nissan Primera is in dier need of this. Thanks guys.

    Reply
  • Axis

    April 14, 2019

    Which direction is wertical?

    Reply
  • Ryan Parker

    April 14, 2019

    Excellent video. Great content.

    Reply
  • SandLeopard003

    April 14, 2019

    it is really a joy to listen to your videos, great job.

    Reply
  • Neil Rosh

    April 14, 2019

    very good!

    Reply
  • crysis4real

    April 14, 2019

    I have been with YouTube for many years now and I must say this has been the best, clear & concise video I've ever watched, really amazing ! Thank you so much ! It is time to sub to your channel 😉

    Reply
  • I am a person

    April 14, 2019

    Why am I subbed and watching you I don't even have a car lmfao

    Reply
  • Tediuki Suzuki

    April 14, 2019

    I caught my lights on my Hyundai Grandeur XG at ten years old before they went yellow and used some Autosol metal polish on an annual basis and also the week before I sold the car . It was 14 years old with 265,000km on the clock when I sold it in 2016 . Toothpaste is another easy medium to use if you want to impress some sex starved housewife .

    Reply
  • Jan Doolin

    April 14, 2019

    Excellent and informative video!

    Reply
  • Thymallus1965

    April 14, 2019

    very nice film…and layout. Thank you. Cheers Torben , Denmark

    Reply
  • ClausenLT

    April 14, 2019

    Hmm, I wonder why if the headlight has a UV protection and the paint has UV protection, why your paint doesn't do this? Oh I know why, thr headlights DO NOT have UV protection! That's why you idiot!

    BTW I'm a paint and body veteran, and unlike this unmitigated moron, I know what I'm talking about!

    Reply
  • Real World Warrior lowen

    April 14, 2019

    $8 walmart product, wipe on wipe off, its over

    Reply
  • sasa kovacevic

    April 14, 2019

    for me perfectly done clip with very good options. Thank you, continue doing clips like this one and ill watch all of them

    Reply
  • A14LNC

    April 14, 2019

    Offt Amazing video, u go to extraordinary lengths to put your point across with all the extras, well done sir, that must have took you a while to make this video ???

    Reply
  • Brian Pleysier

    April 14, 2019

    Great video mate! Well done

    Reply

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