How To Repair Damaged Brick Work



the home surf guide to repairing damaged brickwork like many home repair tasks damaged brickwork should be fixed sooner rather than later to prevent further damage replacing one or two bricks is something that most DIY enthusiasts can tackle however if more than four bricks need replacing then get the professionals in especially if it's a load-bearing wall but if you fancy having a go yourself and you've got a couple of hours to spare let home serve show you how step 1 you will need the hammer drill masonry bit hammer and chisel stiff brush mortar and a new brick step 2 remove the brick the trick is to take the one brick out without causing damage to the surrounding ones so rather than bashing away with a hammer and chisel try drilling a series of holes in the mortar instead when you have gotten all the way around the brick will feel loose now you can use your chisel to completely work it free and clear away the leftover mortar remove any dust with a stiff brush then wet the cleaned area with water to prevent the surrounding bricks from leaching moisture from the mortar step 3 the replacement brick getting bricks that exactly match your wall is key to a successful repair if you're damaged brick is only marked on one side you can simply turn it around and replace it but if it's rotten throughout shop around until you can get an exact match if your new brick isn't quite right you can lighten or darken it see how to characterize bricks for the know-how lay a mortar bed along the bottom and sides of the hole – about two centimetres thick wet the replacement brick and butter the top and sides now the fun bit slide it into place on the wall the mortar will ooze out around the edge but keep tapping it until it is flush with the other bricks use a trowel to add more mortar to the joint packing it in to hold the brick in place step 4 finishing up scrape off any excess mortar from the face of the wall run a pointing tool or length of rubber piping firmly along compacting the joints to create a weatherproof concave finish as good as new that's another job well done but if it's not worked out quite like you planned why not call home serve and we'll do it for you

20 Comments

  • im annonymous

    April 14, 2019

    I need help lol

    Reply
  • Renee Jewell

    April 14, 2019

    I guess the professionals spend all their time on you tube critizing and hating on DIY work instead of actually doing work. Seriously, WTF. I started contacting so called professionals early last week to have bricks repaired (the city is giving me 30 days to get the bricks repaired) still waiting on an estimate from two places and the one that came out for the estimate i am still waiting on the actual estimate to hit my inbox. Now i feel like i have to start the process all over just to get this done.

    Reply
  • Emma Robbie Us

    April 14, 2019

    Looks like the kid was playing video games all day and they offered him $50 to figure this job out.

    Reply
  • Grover895

    April 14, 2019

    If you have a damaged brick right next to a window, how do you repair it with taking the whole window out

    Reply
  • Matt Alisch

    April 14, 2019

    how is this shoddy work?

    Reply
  • Dr. Rosenrosen

    April 14, 2019

    Love these "I know better than you" comments.
    To answer some of your stupid remarks:
    -If you are about to replace a few bricks in your house you don't necessarily need top notch masonry tools to get it done. Using makeshift tools makes it cheaper.
    -The mortar is different in color because it's yet to dry.
    -This video is made for quick DIY repair, it doesn't tell you how to build a brick house or restore the Buckingham Palace so the goddamn quality of the mortar doesn't mean shit as long as it is the right color and holds the brick in place.

    Reply
  • telosfd

    April 14, 2019

     Where can i buy, cement, sand and lime?

    Reply
  • thanxx

    April 14, 2019

    after watching this i tried to water my plants with my jointing iron!
    ps/it didnt work:(

    Reply
  • Andy Hawkshaw

    April 14, 2019

    that looks like pure dog-shit

    Reply
  • I Balboa

    April 14, 2019

    If all of you commenting are professionals why the fuck are you sons of bitches watching this video. The video is absolutely undeniably made for the diy'er who wants to replace 1 or 2 bricks on his house

    Reply
  • mwb7913

    April 14, 2019

    How does he sleep at night !!! Lol

    Reply
  • Mark Jones

    April 14, 2019

    There was nothing wrong with that brick and the one 2 course below as got a crack through the middle. also it needed to be a weathered struck finish not what ever that was what he did.

    Reply
  • Jim Kinkade

    April 14, 2019

    I follow these directions because I oppose the metric system.

    Reply
  • Steel Fury

    April 14, 2019

    BODGE UP!!

    Reply
  • yoga martial

    April 14, 2019

    Very poor

    Reply
  • scarfacelu1

    April 14, 2019

    call homeserve think my 3 year old would of done a better job. hose pipe to joint up face work lol

    Reply
  • StevenEElkins

    April 14, 2019

    It's great to hear comments from some lime mortar proponents. This jackleg reminds me of the hacks over here in the US, who think every historic building contains portland cement. He completely disregarded the fact that joints were tuck pointed as well. I'm surprised he didn't use the water hose to point with. Last but not least the replacement mortar color does not not even match.

    Reply
  • sj bartlett

    April 14, 2019

    Pointing with a hose sure my boss would love that great video aha

    Reply
  • trikemanful

    April 14, 2019

    seems like the guy in the video has no idea. The way he butters a brick in a previous video. And the way he's done this job is a joke, no pointing tool , not lime mortar, and he's methods are diy / Bricky of 30 years

    Reply
  • Repointing Somerset Thomas Kenrick

    April 14, 2019

    That unbelievably bad! I love the way you have disregarded the traditional lime mortar behind then used cement! Do you honestly expect anyone to believe that a job well done?

    Reply

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