How to Pour, Stamp, and Seal a Colored Concrete Backyard Patio



[Applause] [Applause] hi this is David Odell with a dell complete concrete today we're gonna be doing this patio it's a townhouse so the access is a little tricky we can't come around from the front so we're actually entering from a different Street to get into this backyard condo or townhouse this is what it looks like before we start demoing we had a couple little squares for uh some trees or plants something was in there at one time or another but it's gone now so we're gonna demo all this concrete I worked in the front of this house about eight months ago and I did some stamped concrete in the front the back is gonna be the exact same design as the front you may remember if you watch some of my videos you would have seen this front yard project you'll recognize what job it is by the color the two colors I'm using on this one if if you've seen all the videos you'll know which one this is by the stamp design and the colors we have some palm trees around the outside perimeter of this job in the planner bed area and the roots are pretty much everywhere underneath this patio as we start to remove the concrete there's a lot of them scattered around here and what it what it did to the soil with all those little fine feeder roots is compact the soil really well just really densified it the concrete came out relatively easy had no steel reinforcements in it no fiber mesh was probably a basic 2000 psi max which I love removing because it's so easy you know over here where that water hose is we have a sprinkler valve on the corner of the patio it's kind of right in the middle of the glass slider in a plain view if you open those curtains and the slider door you'd see a valve sticking up so we're gonna move those valves over beyond the visibility of looking out of the slider doors we'll move those over then also the pipe that fed those valves were actually on top of the concrete so we're gonna drop that entire mechanism down below the concrete also the homeowner that lives here is pretty handy he likes to do a lot of stuff himself so I dropped him a few sleeves in here in the ground I dropped him some gas line some conduit he's he's gonna run that up a new patio cover and put some overhead lighting in there and then he's also going to encase that gas line with a little barbecue island he's gonna build himself you'll see the gas line material pretty soon here it's all going to be underneath the patio and well-protected as well as the conduit so we had to trim out quite a few palm roots just to get them down below grade we've shortened the distance up on this patio it did extend real close to the palm trees but we actually the new patio is gonna be set back an extra three or four feet from those palms that'll give it some more space to uh for the roots and for watering so they won't get underneath this new slab we widened it but we shortened it off of the house and then we got rid of those two squares that were in the middle that just kind of killed the whole workable space there's the gas line that we'll be using its a three-quarter inch it's seamless and there's no couplings in it so it's one one solid run which is nice because assuming it's made correctly you should have no gas leaks from and an here's some conduits we're gonna drop in here apparently on the inside of that wall there where I'm stubbing them up on the house he's got an outlet in there that he'll piggyback an outlet with a GFI on it and then just run it over here and then all this will be coming up underneath the barbecue island also the fireplace is right there so I guess he's gonna tap I guess there's a gas line in that wall he's gonna tap into so he can bring gas out here so we're setting up the laser level right now to get an idea of how much slope we've got away from the house on the edges of this new patio we're gonna kind of soften it up with some nice radiuses on the corners nice little tight radiuses rather than a square corner now in this back corner that's gonna be my new high point and I'm gonna drain everything out the gate into the backyard it's gonna go into the planner and then it's gonna drain towards the gate at the same time so my starting point is under the weeps Crete a half inch below that gives me two inches below floor level here's a pencil mark I've established a grade there over on this particular stake this is my outside form line there's another pencil mark that's grayed actually those are level marks I put those in level and then I'm just gonna measure down to get my slope that's the nice thing about that laser level you can go around your whole perimeter mark level lines and then take a look at your grade measure down from those level lines get your slope base it on the grade that you have and do that whatever works best there's your outside forum line and there's elevation now we can start fine-tuning fine-tuning the grade that concrete removed we removed out of here your really varied in depth I think it was only about the max up near the house about two and a half inches thick so we had to move a lot of dirt around to get that grade right so we get four inches of concrete in here what we'll be doing on the concrete design is I'm going to mix I believe some Davis color it's Omaha tan we're gonna put that into the mix and then we're going to hit it with some highlighters and peaking release agent that I use the powder we're gonna go with an autumn brown but autumn Browns vary a lot depending on who manufactures it and I like autumn Brown from was it brick form I believe as less red in it than some of the other places so you get more of a brown so I'm using some plastic typically this particular tailor material that I'm using to get the outside edge of my concrete is used in landscaping for the divide grass from your planting bed and you just bury it and leave it in there and that kind of separates the two things and it's very flexible and durable so it works great as a concrete form you can reuse it multiple times and you can bend as tighter radius as you want and it's still nice and rigid you could probably get away with a two-foot radius on this really easy I actually went straight in the middle of this run here I followed this string line and then I just bent it around when I got within about three feet of the corners and when you're dealing with these kind of radius it's all just a matter of preference you can make them however you want as long as they look good and you like them then that's what you go with that's why a lot of times it's easier to just do a straight line form job because you can't change that it is choice it's either straight or it isn't straight with when you starting to get into radius form work and meandering lines it's just a matter of preference and so it could change a hundred times you know in the process but I mean you're throwing some straight forms in it is what it is and that's it so now we're putting some three-eighths or also known as number three rebar on two foot centers starting to set some screens in the middle here the way I always set my screed pins is with a simple two and a half inch by three-quarter inch by 18 inch wood stake with a 16 duplex and they'll driven through it and then I just set the board on top of that and then I can drag my rod on it this is approximately a 7 I mean we went like 7 yards on this patio I actually ordered a really five and a half yards and I ended up about a half a yard short but since it was intrical color I had to order back to yards which was a costly mistake I should have ordered more to begin with you never really want to run out on a color stamp job integral cuz you could run into some color matching issues cold joints things of that nature fortunately where I ran out of concrete on this one I was in the shade and I was at that little walkway at the entrance so it worked out real good for a place to run out so this is what the concrete color looks like when you have intrical it's pretty dark at this point just like any concrete would be whether it had color in it or not it would be a lot darker than what it would be inevitably when it's completely cured out typically I found you need about 45 days and good sunlight to get your real color to show what its gonna look like so that's when when you're using an antique release agent like we did on this one the release agent normally you want a darker shade of whatever color your base is so you have some nice contrast when you rinse the job within a couple of days of your pour both colors look virtually the same there's no contrast so you always wonder how do I know if I'm taking the right amount off or not and that's when you just have to go by with what you know it's kind of like doing it blind here we are I've tied a string line on the end of these extension poles that way I can snap some lines across from these the corner of the fireplace I'm going to put some joints at those locations those are my first joints I'll put in because I know that it's gonna crack there off those corners so I'll put those joints in first then what I'll do after I get those and I'll try to divide this thing up so it kind of looks good so we got out two lines off the fireplace we got one going the long way right down the middle now we don't have a lot of room to run pulls out in here so I'll just push it out at a pull push it out at a pull and as I pull it back I'll just keep disconnecting them that's the way you do these in tight areas someone else is running a tool there and you can see he's kind of dug in at the end there it's kind of a mess right now but I'm gonna fix it pretty soon here now the planar jointer didn't quite knock down that dig in at the end on that one side of the fireplace so actually I'm gonna get out to her a little early when hit it was so funny floats possibly try to knock it down and then I'm gonna go early on some boards along that house and butter that up I guess it was about lunchtime right now because I was about the only one out here finishing the car at this point so here's the funny trial they can cover a lot of area quickly so I've got all my joints in and I've got it troweled in with the funny trowel all I gotta do now is go over this clean up the joints by hand trowel it edge it and it's ready for stamping now we're at the point where we're gonna start stamping as you can see I'm throwing some dust on over it dust over there in the corner and that's the autumn brown I'll throw it out there as far as I can as I work my way out I'll carry the bucket with me on my mats and – in front of me and just keep going around typically it dries quickest along the house if interfere in direct sunlight so that's where we'll stamp first that part we ran out of concrete is down there on that little walkway a little what 8 by 3 8 by 4 so I got to be careful not to throw the powder onto the wet concrete because you don't want to work that into the car because that color will never come out if you do that and you'll have a big dark spot it won't look pretty so this secondary color you got a once you start throwing that on there you don't want to touch the concrete now that object you see there hook to the poles that's a roller that rolls the joints open after we stamp you can use a chisel also and lightly go through it but these rollers make it a lot easier because you can do it from the outside edge or you can get a log long distance without having to hit every foot individually with the chisel so I like the roller in this case so we've got that two-by-four kind of there to break so the dust won't blow over there on to the cleanup load which is a little wetter and it's in the shade so that's what it looks like after you stamp it all kind of looks the same and you really can't see the definition at this point because the powder itself kind of fills up the cracks and crevices and you don't see the contrast so you don't really see all the action going on at this point so again it's kind of guesswork whether or not you hit it all how evenly you hit it but you don't know until you start rinsing the next day that's when you know when you're doing this stuff really kind of you need you need a practice so here's what I start doing on the next day's I sweep up as much of the powder as I can and that could be reused by the way and I have reused it as long as you don't get a lot of Leafs and things blowing into it onto the concrete you can salvage that color antique color and reuse it again on another job but in this case we had a lot of Leafs falling from the trees and it got mixed in so it was all trash so we swept up all the reliefs now what I'm doing is I'm using the pressure washer and that's gonna get enough of that antiquing release agent off to show my base color and it'll show a lot more as the concrete lightens by curing and their actual release agent stays the same color that's when you'll start to see the contrast well here's what it looks like because you can see there's not a lot of contrast at this point like I said before that with the concrete is dark it's gonna lighten the base your antique color is gonna stay the same so as this lightens you're going to see more and more contrast so basically I rinse this kind of just by doing it many times taking the right amount off and I won't know if it's the right amount or if it's even inside come back to seal it so now we're coming back to seal and you can see it's lightened up a lot that base color so you can see more of the contrast at this point and I'm putting on a lacquer base on here and I like to use that a diamond seal from matte Crete it's pretty it's thicker than a lot of the other ones I've noticed and the thicker it is the better it is that's how I judge sealers by its thickness especially your lacquer bases there's your gas line stuff this is where the barbecue we built over so I got all the joints in there this will actually lighten up even more than this not a whole lot but it will lighten up so more than this within the next 20 days I'd say so you'll actually get even a little bit more contrast than what you're seeing right now the nice thing about putting this lacquer based sealer on here is what you're doing is you're protecting the surface from staining damage anything like that so you could preserve this color without fading or ink staining basically forever as long as you maintain that sealer and what you have to do is reseal about every three to five years and it's pretty simple you just pressure wash it make sure it's completely dry and then reseal after you get a few multiple coats on there you may want to wipe it down with some acetone just to get the top layer off and then and then reseal to do that about after after about every 5 times you still you wipe it down with some acetone strips a little bit of the service off then you resell I don't know if anybody uses steam it but we got a little content on there as well so if you use steam it you might find this on there as well also like I said in my last video I've got some apparel like shirts hats a couple other little items on my storefront through my website thanks for watching my video and if you like what you see subscribe because I'm posting about I don't know one or one a week I'm trying to do about one a week have a good day I'll talk to you later you

22 Comments

  • T Cat

    April 15, 2019

    Nice to see real trades men at work. Great job guys. Hopefully your getting the money you deserve to do all that work. It's getting ridiculous up here on Ontario. Square foot price is going down instead of up. Way to much competition around here.

    Reply
  • Mike Olzak

    April 15, 2019

    Great video. Good Job.

    Reply
  • T!.!.!T

    April 15, 2019

    You should make yourself a bunch of patio stone templates to pour any extra concrete you have in the future. Better then just it going to waste.

    Reply
  • Enrique Garcia

    April 15, 2019

    How much does a job like this cost?

    Reply
  • Steve Mazz

    April 15, 2019

    Loved doing stamp concrete. It paid very well…. We were one of the few in our area willing to do the harder patterns where the stamps would interlock.
    We even did over 8000 sq ft in front of the Port Townsend WA ferry landing…. cobble stone pattern.
    Nice job.

    Reply
  • Louis P.

    April 15, 2019

    Like it!

    Reply
  • Robert Nicholls

    April 15, 2019

    Do you prefer the powder release to the liquid ? And have you ever used the little stamps you can put in the joint to give the joints texture?

    Reply
  • Vincent Tulli

    April 15, 2019

    Davit you do nice work I live in the Northeast and stamped concrete here tends to flake is that from too much release agent or temperature

    Reply
  • Omer Sultan

    April 15, 2019

    We had concrete flooring 4 days ago . It's becoming dry now n we can see dry big patches on floor. Guy said he will come next week no seal it. Can we water concrete on daily basis or make it dry n leave for him to come n seal?

    Reply
  • ilovabby1

    April 15, 2019

    As much as I hate doing concrete you’re making me Liking it more ? nice work

    Reply
  • Techno Tard

    April 15, 2019

    This is man Art right here! Nice!

    Reply
  • Ramon Moreno

    April 15, 2019

    Great concrete job and great video! Thank you!

    Reply
  • Kaleb Hopkins

    April 15, 2019

    Very good work, super confused on why there is no compacted rock below though?

    Reply
  • J Burritt

    April 15, 2019

    That is really nice.

    Reply
  • Tahj Carter

    April 15, 2019

    what would this cost without the stamping and what was the piping for ?

    Reply
  • alex isaacs

    April 15, 2019

    How do you fight sag in your level lines? I built a barn two year ago and useda string for the eaves and pulled it tight. But now you can clearly see where they dip from the ends to the middle–clearly caused by string sag.

    Reply
  • Mike Duke

    April 15, 2019

    I may have missed it but did you dowel in to the house foundation? Did you put any material to separate between the brick fireplace and the concrete?

    Reply
  • Jarik C-Bol

    April 15, 2019

    Awesome tip on using the garden grass edging for curved forms, probably will be helpful to me some day.

    Reply
  • Bruce Lee

    April 15, 2019

    my mother is being taken advantage of right now by a concrete/stamp contractor…who is licensed and insured but is doing shoddy work in re doing her patio another contractor did shoddy work of..he has been in the business for 35 yrs…my Dad recently passed so he isnt there to watch over and the way they treat her wouldnt fly with my dad and he was a very intelligent guy while my mom is just ur typical housewife cooks n cleans…

    Anyways long story short the new guys are goin to pour 2-4inches thick over existing patio..they cut the outside perimeter of the patios ..forms around the old patio are 2-4inches higher than existing overlay….My research indicates a pour should be on a even level base with slight slope away from house for run off and not over existing patio….Contractor gave her run around said oh its okay existing concrete is settled wont move its better than base rock and he is using 4000psi with mesh so twice as strong as her old concrete….if i showed u a pic looks like a frankenstein job,…well she paid 2/3rds of the job already so she is already in too deep…they pour this week..i want to stop them but whats done is done..is there a chance he could be right?? he has a legit business we looked it up and everything…contract has a 5 yr warranty…..any advice would be Great…I feel very bad for my mother wish my father was around to help her…

    Reply
  • Bruce Lee

    April 15, 2019

    you forgot the base gravel rock…a rookie mistake but youll learn next time….gravel rock helps with erosion from below

    Reply
  • Marlon Rivera

    April 15, 2019

    Bue trabajo

    Reply
  • copasetic216

    April 15, 2019

    Damn that was beautiful

    Reply

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