29 Comments

  • Hui San

    April 12, 2019

    Watched more than dozen videos about dovetail jigs, yours is simple the easiest to understand. Thanks for this very educational video.

    Reply
  • Javier Ramirez

    April 12, 2019

    For plywood drawers , need it quality plywood im get it at plywood lumber company , cheap plywood at H D or L w s not good for drawers.

    Reply
  • clive Lee

    April 12, 2019

    Treat yourself to a Leigh jig , your worth it

    Reply
  • Alex Mendoza

    April 12, 2019

    What type of ruoter do I need for a craftsman DOVETAIL model 315.25791

    Reply
  • Richard Atkinson

    April 12, 2019

    great video, I put you on my favorite list

    Reply
  • Pat M

    April 12, 2019

    I just recently got a Porter Cable 5008 model unit from a friend and he did not have the manual, it looks like a match to yours. I'm trying to figure out as it relates to the offset stop setup but was hoping you could shed some light on it?? Thanks Pat

    Reply
  • Ronnie Elliott

    April 12, 2019

    I have the Rockler #1402, that I purchased from Rockler a number of years ago, but never watched how the pros did it on Youtube. Great presentation, liked knowing how to use the hood that I have now mounted on my chop saw. Now to go make a stand for it to use with my box joint jig. I made a few hive bodies wit the jig, but not in several years, needed refresher coarse, Im a hobby beekeeper, needing new deep hive body, for brood.  Thanks

    Reply
  • Paulo De Oliveira

    April 12, 2019

    Instead of replacing the whole jig why don't you measure up the template portion of the jig (with vernier, etc.) draw it out and get someone to laser/waterjet cut it from stainless steel. Also you would do well to put some plastic handles to replace the the hex nuts so you won't have to open and close those jaws with a socket wrench. Think about it.

    Reply
  • Gaurav Khairnar

    April 12, 2019

    really amazing 

    Reply
  • Attila Danci

    April 12, 2019

    thank you…

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    Thanks Neal. I don't cut a lot finger joints, but I think those combs on the jig are too short for any but the thinnest stock.

    Reply
  • Neal Fortin

    April 12, 2019

    Thank you so much for posting this video. I inherited one of these jig from my dad but never saw him use it. I made a perfect dovetail on my first practice try!

    Have you ever used the jig to make finger joints? Seems like it would be possible, one board at a time in the bottom (vertical) position.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    The title is for the series. I am aware the drawer stock is not plywood. I do not dovetail plywood.

    Reply
  • Sam G

    April 12, 2019

    The tile of this episode is "How to make PLYWOOD…." what you are using is not plywood. I have a problem with plywood, it chops and I have destroyed so much scrap wood, and now I am experimenting on real plywood all kinds to no avail. do you have any suggestions? can you make an episode showing how to dovetail in plywood? and please show me how to adjust the router. I am a determent beginner but I need to save costs too. Thanks

    Reply
  • Bob Bailey

    April 12, 2019

    I damaged my guide within a couple of hours of using it. The router jumped out as yours did. I repaired it with epoxy cement and filed it accurately to shape. It worked a treat.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    That is a Porter Cable 5008 that is officially worn out. I am shopping for another jig just for half blind work for when I do more commercial type work and not furniture. Thousands of times running that bushing guide against the plastic and metal deformation of the jig make it a pain. I cut 24 drawers this summer and said enough.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    It does not matter how thick the material is. The 17/32 is the distance of dovetail bit from the bottom of the router. You make your cut to the full depth of the template. Dovetails jigs are confusing. Make cuts in scrap stock to get it right in your own mind. I really think my marking method I show in this series keeps from making mistakes. You may need to make some slight depth adjustments around 17/32 either up or down to get to just the fit you need. Just practice and it will make sense.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    askwoodman @ gmail com You ask as many questions as you like.

    Reply
  • Jim Jones

    April 12, 2019

    Allan, I have a wide assortment of tools but am in the process of learning to use them. No one in my area wants to give me much help. Thanks for the offer to help me and I'll try not to be a nuisance but may throw a question from time to time. You said your email was gmail, where can I find the full email address? Thanks again.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    In my Ultimate Work Table Series I show a hybrid method of cutting through dovetails with the table saw and hand tools. It is a method to produce a really fantastic joint very easily. There are some really fun and relaxing aspects of doing it too. Feel free to write me at gmail if you have any woodworking questions. Keep in touch. Allan

    Reply
  • Jim Jones

    April 12, 2019

    Hope that what I am doing is ok. Open for suggestions. Thanks Jim

    Reply
  • Jim Jones

    April 12, 2019

    Allan, Thanks for the reply. I am a novice at woodworking and have been trying to learn to do dovetails. I bought a cheep dovetail set from Harbor Freight and have been trying to learn the method. My unit also has some nicks in it but today I finally figured out how to make a good joint. I trim the tails but only enough to allow the rounded portion to fit in the slot. Through trial and error I finally got my settings correct. Then I noticed that you trim yours more than I did.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    It is just the way it is with this type of jig. I am actually in the market for another that is better. But even so the strength is really high. I have 20 year old shop boxes made with this jig that have received level 10 abuse with no signs of coming apart. Thanks for writing.
    Allan

    Reply
  • Jim Jones

    April 12, 2019

    Why do you trim from the front of the tails. Wouldn't it be a stronger joint if less was trimmed off. Thanks

    Reply
  • Mario art

    April 12, 2019

    Can you make a video explaining the actual setup of the jig and stock.
    A good result depends totally on setup not the actual routing.
    I'd like to know how and why you calc the correct depth of the bit.
    How to offset the stock corectly in detail, does stock thickness matter?
    If I use a 1/2" dovetail jig, does the stock offset have to be exactly 1/2" inch?

    Reply
  • MiCompre

    April 12, 2019

    I guess you must design a piece, within the limitations of your jig or Festools. (I use a Keller Jig for Dovetails, in these applications, so I know that sometimes, my designs and procedures (Which are much like your as it happens) are formulated within the limitations of the tools I have. Okay I suppose, but some people say it's limiting! Don't worry about me rambling ! Thanks for this. Interesting series.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    @smfield That's right. This type of jig is fixed. I would have had to trim the stock to make the spacing work out.

    Reply
  • Shulom Ben Ruban

    April 12, 2019

    Does it matter much that you don't have half pins at each end? This is because you can't adjust the pin-tail spacing.

    Reply
  • AskWoodMan

    April 12, 2019

    @wdworking There are stops at each end top and bottom that determine the offset. These stops have variable settings depending on the bit/bushing combination you are using. So if you are justified against the stops and the two pieces meet exactly flush and the bit depth is set right, you can just get in a groove and go. Each template is different, but these half blind jigs all work on the same mechanics. Even after all these years I still cut a scrap joint first to check my setup.

    Reply

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