How to Choose the Right Landscape Drainage System: Stormwater Runoff Solutions



recent research indicates that a well-maintained landscape can increase the value of a home by as much as 15% on the other hand a poorly maintained landscape can lead to costly water damage to the structure of the house installing a drainage system to prevent water damage is less costly than repairing the water damage itself given the destructive effect that water has on how structures and landscapes every landscape needs a proper drainage system one of the biggest sources of runoff water in a landscape is the downspout that funnels large volumes of water from the roof to the immediate area around the house without a drainage system the water will eventually cause costly damage to the structure of the house one method of redirecting the water away from the property is by connecting the downspout directly to a drainpipe buried in the landscape the downside to this method is that leaves and debris from the roof are carried through the downspout and into the drain pipe which eventually leads to clogging of the drainage system the best way to redirect the water from a downspout is to install a catch basin either directly underneath the downspout we're away from the downspout but in line with a drain pipe to which the downspout is connected the catch basin will catch all the debris from the roof before clogs the drain pipe without a drainage system the root systems of flowers and other sensitive plants can be damaged by over watering and can create health and safety issues installing a round speedy Basin or a square catch basin and flower beds will remove excess water before the root system of the flowers are drowned and damaged speedy basin is a small round catch basin that has a sump area to catch debris before it enters the drain pipe catch basins installed in flowers should be used with atrium grates rather than flat grates the debris and mulch in a flower bed tend to cover and clog the top of a flat grate an atrium grade is domed above the landscape so that it does not get covered in clogged by debris and mulch atrium grates should only be used in areas where there is no traffic landscape naturally absorbs runoff water until it becomes saturated and water begins to puddle throughout the lawn using catch basins at various low spots throughout the lawn can eliminate puddling by allowing the excess water to be collected and redirected to safer areas channel drains are long and narrow drains installed within the concrete of the driveway or patio channel sizes vary from one inch to twelve inches in width like a roof gutter channel drains collect large volumes of water that flow across hard surfaces before it can puddle or flow into the inside of the house or adjacent landscape water from the drainage system is typically discharged through a drain pipe to the street terminating the drain pipe with a pop-up emitter will prevent debris small animals and insects from entering the pipe the pop-up you meter has a spring-loaded lid that automatically opens with a hydrostatic pressure of water flowing through the drain pipe as flow diminishes the emitter closes again an alternative method to discharging the water is by slowly percolating or leaching it back into the landscape with a flow will the flow well is a large plastic container buried in the landscape that allows water to slowly leach out into the subsoil and prevent the pollutants from being washed out into the streets as water flows over rooftops paved surfaces and flowerbeds it picks up various pollutants including oil grease chemicals metals and bacteria by discharging the water into the street pollutants are carried through the city's main storm drainage system and into local ponds lakes and oceans many cities have required that storm water be retained within the property to reduce pollution of resources the installation of a proper drainage system adds value to the property and protects it from water damage with a complete line of drainage products in the S has a solution for all your drainage needs NDS the nationwide leader and landscape drainage products [Applause]

43 Comments

  • Bernard Lee

    April 12, 2019

    Do you ever experience problems with sitting water in the catch basins? I'm considering installing them, but I'm worried about the potential for mosquitos. Thank you!

    Reply
  • vaibhav sharma

    April 12, 2019

    Thank you 🙂

    Reply
  • Paula Kaz

    April 12, 2019

    Very informative and helpful video! thanks

    Reply
  • DFS54

    April 12, 2019

    Thanks for this good video.

    Reply
  • bigcrushjake

    April 12, 2019

    If you're gutters are protected with gutter guards, is a catch basin necessary under the downspout? Is there a way to deal with shingle grit interfering with flow in the corrugated pipes?

    Reply
  • Jono Dufourspitze

    April 12, 2019

    0:36 Is that in need of repair??

    Reply
  • Joseph Sokoloski

    April 12, 2019

    Is a 6 inch pipe needed for a house? After the pipe goes from the rain liter into the ground? And does it have to be below frost level and why? thank you if you can answer..

    Reply
  • jeffthewhiff

    April 12, 2019

    I noticed in the video that PVC pipe is used instead of corrugated pipe. Currently, I have corrugated pipe installed underground in my backyard that is connected to one downspout and I would like to connect my sump pump drain to the downspout drain. Is it okay to do that? Also, if PVC pipe is used and connected to the flow well, should the PVC pipe have holes in the bottom leading to the flow well?

    Reply
  • paul mryglod

    April 12, 2019

    Our local Lowe's didn't know what a pop up emitter is.

    Reply
  • Joe Joe

    April 12, 2019

    What is the maxium depth from pop up emitter to elbow? How deep can this be? I live in northern ontario so have to take winter into consideration.. Thx

    Reply
  • Debbiebabe69

    April 12, 2019

    Isnt diverting stormwater onto the STREET completely illegal and dangerous? Unsuspecting cars could hit your runoff at speed and skid off, killing the driver.

    Reply
  • Bruce Norman Smith

    April 12, 2019

    yes, catch basin ideas are great!

    Reply
  • lee mcculloch

    April 12, 2019

    some lovley photoshop at start

    Reply
  • Michael Tioko

    April 12, 2019

    Thank you

    Reply
  • Mondana Rezania

    April 12, 2019

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

    Reply
  • Gene Graves

    April 12, 2019

    Consider doing a video that addresses special needs in freezing winter conditions

    Reply
  • shabbir alihusain

    April 12, 2019

    great
    //

    Reply
  • Christopher Gramza

    April 12, 2019

    This was an extremely informative video.  Thank you for posting this.

    Reply
  • William Johnson

    April 12, 2019

    Great info!

    Reply
  • Ric T. 49

    April 12, 2019

    would the pop up get caught in a lawn mower if say it was in the yard ? would it pop up. it seems to move pretty freely.

    Reply
  • first last

    April 12, 2019

    so much information. thank you

    Reply
  • Kierran Smith

    April 12, 2019

    what about when then water table come up ??

    Reply
  • Patrick Kelly

    April 12, 2019

    Very informative. The Flo-well looks like an easier way to do an old-fashioned "dry well" to percolate water into the soil. I will try one of these on my new house. I have never noticed a pop-up emitter around here(SF Bay Area). It seems to be a good idea that helps conserve water, which is a big deal around here. It also keeps pollutants out of the streams. I will try one of these, too.

    Reply
  • JR B

    April 12, 2019

    Videos can look easy and simple. My attempt to install drainage solution turned into anything but easy and simple. Builder made the driveway angle toward a bank and house lower than street. Rain creates a small lake; takes days to drain/dry. Looked simple to install a catch box and route the drain under the driveway. Cut across, dug the trench, but quickly realized that in order for the line to drain, it had to be deeper than the 12" catch box, a lot deeper. Kept testing and when water would finally run through the pipe the line was 14" deep and at the neighbor's property. So, a popup drain would not work. How is one to know? These EZ videos assume you have a large property and the angle of your property is always perfect. If you can afford it, get professional help.

    Reply
  • Roger Sargent

    April 12, 2019

    awesome video it has touched on most of the problems with drainage , I have a sump pump that goes off every 30 minutes that when it empties the water into the yard there is so much of it it makes for a soggy yard, I was thinking of adding an easy drain French drain pipe in the ground under the grass but we have clay soil, is there a better way

    Reply
  • james hawkins

    April 12, 2019

    Great video! I am looking at a home and it has a few drains that need to be fixed! I will definitely keep your company in mind for products.

    Reply
  • Kevin Polley

    April 12, 2019

    Hi NDS,

    I have a split level in CT on a fairly level lot. We have compacted silt soil (mostly clay). The downspout drainage system is currently clay tiles that run into dry wells. Some of the dry wells have collapsed, and some of the drain tiles have collapsed, so the drainage system is in need of repair. There is no french drain around the house.

    There has been some water damage to the slab floor on the two story side of the house because of poor drainage by this side of the home. Over the years, water has made its way under the slab, frozen, and warped the concrete floor. The the water needs to get diverted away from this side of the house, and while I'm looking to do that, I think it would be a good time to update all of the drainage around the house. 

    Just from my explanation, what type of drainage system would you lean towards? Downspout drains, or a french drain? I've heard that dry wells are not great solutions for the compacted silt/clay soil type that we have here. I'm also not sure that dry wells would be able to handle all of the runoff with the soil type in our area. Would I have to tie my storm drainage into the public storm drains on the street, costing big bucks?

    Thanks, 

    Kevin

    Reply
  • Billy Smith

    April 12, 2019

    Good point about debris being caught in gutters then pipe. Using a catch basin seems to me the best solution.

    Reply
  • Mark Rogers

    April 12, 2019

    A housing development was built uphill from our home, and the developer did not install proper drainage.  As a result, our landscape takes on a large amount of runoff and we now have a "soggy lawn" issue during rainy season.  What would you recommend as an effective long-term solution?

    Reply
  • estsidemoto

    April 12, 2019

    I live on a hill and when it rains it seems to wssh away the seeds I put down for grass in the patches I have that have been created by the rain how can I redirect the water to the streets

    Reply
  • M McNoodle

    April 12, 2019

    I don't have any issues of water around my foundation, fortunately.  I have a cement path around the entire house next to the foundation and am thinking about putting down crushed stone over it to dress it up, at least in the front yard.  Will this create a problem?

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    It is always a good idea to install a Pop-Up Emitter, even if you have a Flo-Well or a traditional dry well system. The Pop-Up Emitter will provide a place for the water to go that is not absorbed into the ground. This can happen if the water entering the Flo-Well is greater than the storage capacity of the Flo-Well.

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    Yes you can and this is called a dry well. The only problem with a traditional dry well is that you only have up to 40% of the available storage because the gravel is taking up most of the space. The Flo-Well creates an open space in the ground that can hold 50 gallons. The Flo-Well is 2’ round by 2’ tall. To get the same 50 gallons in a gravel dry well, the hole would have to be 2’ round by 5.32’ deep. While both solutions work, we find the Flo-Well to be more efiicient.

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    In order for a channel drain to be effective, the runoff water needs to drain towards the drain. If your driveway slopes towards the center, then the channel can be installed there to catch runoff water. Hope this was helpful.

    Reply
  • REWYRED

    April 12, 2019

    I was thinking about that as well! Even going right up the center with a channel so water does not have far to travel on the surface, especially in winter.

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    Hi Cherie! Were you able to locate our products at Lowe's? If not, we also have some distributors near you that would also be able to help you out: Turf Care, Viking or Solutions Aquasol. I hope you are able to find what you are looking for and thanks for reaching out to us.

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    We're so glad to hear that you were able to solve your drainage problem! As for your driveway, a 12” x 12” catch basin is one possible solution to this problem. The drawback to using a catch basin is that the surface needs to be graded such that the water is directed to the catch basin. A channel drain is a long drain that is installed across the driveway to capture anything that flows towards the drain. It will collect water over a larger area and would be the better solution.

    Reply
  • REWYRED

    April 12, 2019

    Just installed a spee-D basin and round cover to rectify a water pooling issue, problem solved! Thinking one of those 12 X 12? catch basins might be in order for the driveway when its time to re-pave.

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    Thanks for your interest in our products. All of the Lowe's in Canada carry NDS drainage products, including the one in Ontario! Please reach out to us and let us know if you have any further trouble finding our products and we wish you luck on your next drainage product!

    Reply
  • Cherie BLK

    April 12, 2019

    Where can we buy these products near Ottawa, Ontario Canada.?

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    You are very welcome. Please don't hesitate to message again with any other inquiries and we wish you luck on all your drainage endeavors!

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    No question is a dumb question! The answer is, yes you can absolutely use a pop up emitter with a perforated pipe. A pop-up emitter should be installed at the end of every drainage installation. This allows a place for any excess water to go.

    Reply
  • NDS Stormwater Management

    April 12, 2019

    Hi Joe, thanks for your question! In the winter time, the surface would freeze. This would prevent water from draining to the surface. The Pop-up emitter should be installed on an elbow that has a weep hole. The weep hole will allow water in the pipe to drain. This will solve the problem with the emitter being frozen. The elbow should be installed below the frost depth. A section of pipe can be connected to the elbow to bring the Pop-up to the surface. Hope this helps.

    Reply

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