CHAIN & SPROCKET MAINTENANCE Cross Training Enduro



here we are all set to head north from Toronto for five days should be fun ganna Raska forest is 11,000 acres of riding tracts not far from Toronto and it's the home of trail tools who helped us run the coaching sessions there these guys have introduced hundreds to riding for the first time and we're a huge help with our coaching sessions thanks guys I just want to say these Canadians are freaks of nature when it comes to balance it was interesting to see the Australian Tire Moto's hybrid fitted tall the trail tours bikes and a few others as well ha chains and sprockets maintenance was a topic of discussion on one of our days they're upset at plenty of times I actually don't know much about mechanical stuff but like everyone I keep learning as I go along so here's some basic information and discussion about chains and sprockets adjusting and replacing chains and sprockets ain't fun the best way to make them last and not have to be constantly adjusting is by quality gear in my experience cheap chains just ain't worth it a stretch faster need more adjustment and as they where they bugger up your sprockets faster as well usually you should replace your sprockets and chain at the same time as a worn chain will wear new sprockets faster and vice versa oh god we could be here all day a static ballad there yeah however there are expensive sprockets that are extremely durable and many riders say these will last through two or three quality change it's creating groups just brutal your front sprocket usually wears the fastest any claim you can prolong your chain and rear sprocket line by replacing the front sprocket the moment it starts to show a bit of wear such as the teeth just starting to book over I've been doing this myself for years and it seems to be true came to hear from others Ganner Oscar from the air one of the trail tour coaches also flies planes and took us up the mad bugger even let me ply his Cessna and straight run an o-ring Cheyney most enduro bikes come standard with this and these less maintenance and lasts longer as the o-ring seals in every length keeping the internal chain grease safe from the outside elements nan-oh ring chains are usually used on motocross and Trials bikes as they are lighter and have a bit less friction if you want that last fraction of horsepower or racing adjust your change regularly I chatted with a bike mechanic recently who said most bikes that come into his shots have change that are too tight or too loose causing premature wear hey Mike watch out for the drop bear a chain that's too tight will quickly stretch it and wear fast too loose and it's wearing a chain guides and can get very noisy with all that chain slap ah for long Canadian motocross this is as big as the bike scare maintain your chain clean it after every ride if you use a pressure washer don't get it too close as it can force water past your o-rings and inside the link if you use solvents be careful what you use as some can cause swelling of the o-rings or deteriorate the rubber o-rings over time here's an interesting test done by one rider put lube on your chain or at least something like silicon spray after washing to prevent rust buried is a terrible Philip if you are truly determined to make something happen and you're persistent you can do anything you want to live or not Lube your chain this is an interesting debate some say chain lubricant attracts mud and dust which acts as an abrasive compound on your sprocket and chain to wear them faster so all they do is use something like silicon spray or chain wax to prevent rust and keep those o-rings healthy personally I stopped using chain lube years ago and my chain and sprockets seemed to last the same amount of time using silicon spray and it's much easier to clean the chain as there's no buildup of mud and dust I'm no expert if you have decent information or research on this topic let me know when to replace chains and sprockets I've always been on a budget and I will go until the sprocket teeth are getting substantially borne and over some riders even go until the teeth are so hooked over the chain is starting to slide over the teeth I wouldn't recommend that the most effective way to measure chain wear is to remove it and measure it once it gets past a certain degree of stretch it's time to replace it the other thing to look for is when your chain starts to King this happens when your earrings begin to fail or you have used a pressure washer and forced water inside the links once you lose that internal lubrication it's only a matter of time before your chain rusts internally and will break it may not happen for a long time but it can really mess up a ride when it does happen

47 Comments

  • jon rheaume

    April 15, 2019

    How to maintain a chain 101. Buy a good chain roll it into a roll. melt paraffin wax into a coffee can using a coat hanger dunk up and down like your dunking a tea bag and let soak. Before the wax sets up pull out your chain and let dry just till you can handle it. Put it on the bike and ride all you want until you have to clean your bike. clean your bike and pull it off grab the same wax and reheat it. And repeat process. You're welcome. Wax will keep all water displaced at all times and is better than oil.

    Reply
  • Dylan Therrien

    April 15, 2019

    2:02 super sexy babe look quick

    Reply
  • Josh Wendt

    April 15, 2019

    Bel-ray chain lube, the best stuff there is. Spray it on a dirty chain and after a ride it will be perfectly clean

    Reply
  • N K

    April 15, 2019

    light or dry lubes are definitely best for offroad use. chain waxes are crap and just create grinding paste to destroy your chain and sprockets. I use a loobman oiler with piss thin oil and it keeps my chain mint?

    Reply
  • Gabe Williams

    April 15, 2019

    I have found that bearing grease such as belray, makes a great chain lubricant and in some way prevents excessive build up of debris on non-oring chains!

    Reply
  • M Blake Jr

    April 15, 2019

    graphite?

    Reply
  • Tim Cook

    April 15, 2019

    I've always used old engine oil in a small sauce bottle for chain lube as it doesnt make the chain sticky, doesn't attracted dirt and dust as it will fling and is a good lubricant. Not to bad to clean off and is basically free.

    Reply
  • nathan stevenson

    April 15, 2019

    maxima chain wax spray, apply after each ride while the chain is still hot.. give it a good spin, works great.

    Reply
  • Chris Dealny

    April 15, 2019

    I looked at my bros KTM front sprocket to check what way the hooks went ( he uses new parts asap) and the hooks were facing toward the front wheel, so I put my front sprocket on the same way. Then I noticed some reinforcing on the opposite side of the hook and thought hey, obviously the hooks are meant to be there.
    This is a near new front sprocket and I have had no problems so far, it just freaking works. Now stop BBQing shrimps.

    Reply
  • Chris Dealny

    April 15, 2019

    Weird I just changed my front sprocket, it was hooked over and i thought hey that hook is to catch the chain properly, no problems yet infact it's going freaking awesome.

    Reply
  • Cristian lundin norberg

    April 15, 2019

    ?????☺️????????????????‍?‍?

    Reply
  • Gianluca Stefani

    April 15, 2019

    Hi!

    I've a suggestion for this subject.

    Another option to lube our dirt bike chain is using hi density oil (like sae 80-90). It's a very cheap option. As a matter of fact, this oil is dense and will not go away from your chain easily like motor oil. In addition, it will clean your chain: the surplus of oil that you put on the chain will fall with all the dust and other impurities that are on the chain. Japanese have already suggested it on the 1st and 2nd generation Transalp use and maintenance manual.

    Finally, another safe option to clean the chain is oil lamp. Cheap and doesn't kill O-rings.

    Thanks for your vids!

    Gianluca

    Reply
  • Derek Dust

    April 15, 2019

    I've been trialling WD40 PTFE Dry Lube (this isn't a plug for WD40 btw, there are several other teflon dry lubes out there). The product description states that it will repel dust and other gunk and so far it seems to do what it says. The jury is still out at the moment – in my case anyway – as to whether it actually does increase chain and sprocket life though.

    Reply
  • Charles Blanc

    April 15, 2019

    Case solution spot meal ban merchant.

    Reply
  • Chris Halliday

    April 15, 2019

    Also ment to ask, I am thinking about adjusting my chain after I align the rear axle with the front sprocket nut, thus the chain is in the tightest position during suspension compression/rebound. I am just not sure how much slack I should run in the tightest position. WRR

    Reply
  • Chris Halliday

    April 15, 2019

    Just loving these videos! Was nice to see you here in BC riding, wish I had of learn of the courses earlier as I could really use them. Look forward to seeing you back again. Keep up the great work.

    P.S. I have since learnt I need to pause the videos to read the disclaimers as they are absolutely hilarious. This one not so much but you get the idea 🙂 Note to everyone else, pause and have a read.

    Reply
  • dazza421970

    April 15, 2019

    I got 15 000 kays out of original KTM640 Adv chain and sprockets. 80/20 road/dirt.

    Reply
  • nicksonrobert

    April 15, 2019

    I have a small bore bike, it is an enduro bike (KTM XC) but a 150 and due to the size I've been told an o-ring chain will slow it down. Is this a true concern? I bought it used this year and it has a non o-ring chain currently.

    Reply
  • 2wheelLove

    April 15, 2019

    I really like bell ray chain wax…dries almost instantly and really stays on the chain…and it does a good job of repelling dirt and water. I would say I could go a few rides without even having to re-apply. Plus, the wax is great for levers, pegs, and brake linkages.

    Reply
  • Stephen Hill

    April 15, 2019

    On a sealed chain (o- or x-ring) it is the rollers that need the lube. The rollers need to move as freely as possible, outside the bushings, which need to move as freely outside the pins. Three concentric circles, pin in center, bushing next, roller outside that. The interface between the pin and bushing is sealed by the o-ring for the life of the chain, and is certainly the far more lube critical and contamination averse of the two. But I've heard bad things happen and chains break from no lube on the rollers as well. If you think about it, it makes sense. The roller gets twisted, or pivoted, a fairly small number of degrees around the bushing every time it engages and disengages from a sprocket. But if it can't pivot because it is hot, dry, dirty and effectively seized, the friction forces on that engage/dis go way up. Which translates to more heat where the problem is. So you've got seized rollers engaging and dis on each sprocket, on each revolution, and now the friction is much greater, and between the outside of the rollers and the sprockets, rather than how it should be.

    Reply
  • Joshua peters

    April 15, 2019

    what's the stock gearing of your 300? also what did you change it to for your style of riding? just want an idea of how much gearing you do…

    Reply
  • adidas267

    April 15, 2019

    I know the "old school" approach for chain maintenance is to soak an o-ring chain in kerosene and then put motor oil on it. i personally have no issue with good chain lubricant.

    Reply
  • gasdive

    April 15, 2019

    I've been using olive oil with a scottoiler for about 2 years and 16 000 km. Mostly 'road' but lots of dirt road. Olive oil has a very high level of 'oilyness'. It spreads well and wets everything however it doesn't stick and dirt just washes off with a gentle hose. Olive oil used to be a lubricant but it degrades at high temperatures so it fell out of favour. There's no high temperatures on a chain, so that's not an issue. It's completely compatible with o'rings and it washes out of clothes without staining (its used on industrial spinning machines for that reason). It's also very cheap as the missus buys it for me with the rest of the shopping.

    Reply
  • MasterBeta343

    April 15, 2019

    Huh is that why my dads chain is so stuck

    Reply
  • Руслан Кулиев

    April 15, 2019

    qara sevda

    Reply
  • Traction eRag

    April 15, 2019

    McLovin' this vid! Great fun…

    Reply
  • JoeJoe Moto

    April 15, 2019

    Yeah, I do the replacement of front sprockets often before doing a chain and sprocket set.

    Reply
  • Harald Eberhardt

    April 15, 2019

    and what sprockets and chain rings do people use?

    Reply
  • hello jaja

    April 15, 2019

    How'd you like ganaraska? Did you try any hill climbs?

    Reply
  • Ben Weller

    April 15, 2019

    Nice vid!!! Just wondering, does anyone know if degreaser would work for cleaning chains?

    Reply
  • Millermacs

    April 15, 2019

    I enjoyed seeing some Hondas again, all these videos about you're guys's precious European princesses. Great vid mate.

    Reply
  • Mr. MidLifeCrisis

    April 15, 2019

    we ride two enduros in that forest every year, glad to see you made the trip over, that's some really nice trail and one of the few places that gets better when it rains. have fun!

    Reply
  • MotoJD

    April 15, 2019

    Can anyone tell me the name of the Hondas in this Video?
    Not the little one haha

    Reply
  • Rustic Thumper

    April 15, 2019

    A few months ago I watched a chain maintenance vid put out by Revzilla. Very informative to say the least. They cut an O ring chain up and put the O rings into different solvents to see what happens. The results were surprising. Now days I just do as they suggested, use kero and a firm nylon bristled brush to clean the chain and when the chain has dried I lightly spray a chain lube on the chain, wait for it to go tacky then wipe all excess lube off the chain.

    Reply
  • InfallibleWeatherman

    April 15, 2019

    Chain cleaner and some good ol white lithium grease does the trick

    Reply
  • Flyright07

    April 15, 2019

    hope you enjoyed it over here. fun watching you ride our local terrain. love the channels and always look forward to the posts.

    Reply
  • tinnedspicedham

    April 15, 2019

    Chains don't stretch. They wear inside the moving parts of the rollers, making the distance between rollers get bigger until it damages the sprocket teeth. This same discussion is oft had by cyclists, especially mountain bikers who also like to play in dirt, mud and sand. But for bicycles there are a plethora chain wear tools to easily see when a chain is approaching it's useful life. If you replace a bicycle chain before it gets past a certain point (by using the wear gauge), you can get away with at least 3 chains per set of sprockets. I'm surprised these wear tools aren't as common for motorcycles. Here's a discussion I found about it:

    http://dirttricks.com/measuring-chain-wear

    Reply
  • Wide000

    April 15, 2019

    I am sorry if it may sound extremely pretentious but I think I will try this silicone stuff in hope of replacing the usual sticky mess. .

    Reply
  • Allen Huling

    April 15, 2019

    Another great vid, Barry! I was just thinking, the other day, about how my chain seems to attract grit. May need to adjust something!

    Reply
  • The Moto fixery

    April 15, 2019

    best thing I have found is the Honda chain lube with molly! I have also started using a spray molly before applying the Honda stuff. it goes on liquid and dries. then the Honda lube keeps the rust away, is easy to clean later, and doesn't make a mess or fling off. check out molybdenum disulfide lubricant spray. its great stuff!

    Reply
  • markmtbrider

    April 15, 2019

    Chain wax and cable lube for o ring chains. Maybe you could post a date for the return trip,and us gumbies could rent some hondas and join in on the fun.

    Reply
  • Justin R

    April 15, 2019

    I've been using the Bell Ray SuperClean chain lube for awhile now. I've tried everything over the years and It's been my favorite. It's white and non sticky and doesn't make a mess. Nothing sticks to it and it brings your chain back to life looking new again after every wash. Looks like you had a blast in Canada… Another great video!! Keep um coming… Thanks. Justin from Connecticut..

    Reply
  • CANAL MOTORS NEWS

    April 15, 2019

    very good

    Reply
  • Gordon Smith SA

    April 15, 2019

    ….great video and topic. I like your silicon idea. I would like to share a small tip that a mechanic showed me many years ago, when lubing a chain always spray on the inside of the chain, that way centrifugal force will distribute the oil covering the chain better on both sides. Keep the vids coming…..

    Reply
  • Captain Licorice

    April 15, 2019

    The one thing about us from Nova Scotia is that we're almost the same as Australians from the outback, Good cooks, inbred and most of us are criminals in some way. We just don't have the silly accent!

    Reply
  • Paul Rhodes

    April 15, 2019

    Good vid

    Reply
  • AverageJoe DirtBikes

    April 15, 2019

    I would recommend only lubing the chain on wet rides because it protects the chain from water but in dusty dry or sandy rides it makes abrasive particles stick to the chain apply the lubricant when you plan not to riding the bike for a while because it prevents splatter and decreases the sickness as well it makes my chains quite as well as extending sprocket life due to less friction on the teeth…

    Reply

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