Bunkie prefab cabin uses joinery & assembly of furniture design

Bunkie prefab cabin uses joinery & assembly of furniture design



it is small because this is only a hundred square feet so this is a full queen-size bed and still enough room to walk all the way around a bunkie is a bit of a term of endearment for a bunk house and that's very much I'm a scope term and Muskoka is a really nice sort of cottagey Lake area about an hour to north of here that's one of the reasons why we called it the bunkie and call their company the monkey company because there's a really good market for that there because it's really difficult to get changes to zoning and permits up in that area oh if I can go head to toe here cuz I'm about six three oh yeah that's good the poly feels better around here though right yeah nope that's it just push the boundaries of the sort of permit law but I had a ton of functionality that might not otherwise have been thought of in this size of space I do a lot of small space furniture storage things and whatnot so this is the larger scale that I would do because I literally can have a hand and everything in this and still control it so yeah so these are just the pullout drawers so if you're staying for a weekend friends or family could just bring their own things this is an ethanol burning fireplace although he doesn't necessarily use that because he's got this AC and heat unit and we use this as like a little LED system so you can build this completely no permit off-grid with this light system because this is just a 12 volt LED light system that comes with a little driver we have these small valves that are up top so if you do leave for extended periods of time you open those up and that allows some air circulation because often in buggies or small cottage or camps if you're left for a long period of time you get the dampness we have also screened awnings you can here so you'd be able to move airflow as well and there's a roller blind or roller screen here there are lots of bugs in this area and then there's also blinds these roller blinds that we have custom-made as well so it is a big window so it can let a lot of light in and it can let a lot of heat in so and the times when the Sun is hitting the window you can lower these blinds you know stuff for privacy as well it's considered a blackout blind but it doesn't completely block up because you've got the space up top the glass wall is so critical to enjoying such a small square footage such a small amount of space so letting as much of your outside environment inside often with small cabins you have just a few windows and a door what we wanted to develop as a product that you could feel secure and safe in and put in the middle of you know a beautiful surrounding or setting and and be able to sleep or stay within it and and really experience it my background is furniture design I'm an industrial designer and I met an architectural designer probably six years ago and we wanted to work on a project collaboratively so we thought what could we do that blends architecture and furniture a lot of things factored into where furniture starts or architecture stops it has to do with scale I believe and also sort of the limits of the machines that you're using this even the structure everything is is furniture based so the walls and the floor and the roof are a CNC cut parts that are machined to a very high tolerance the way furniture is done the idea of being able to bolt this together the way that the floors and the walls and things pull together and even though the connections that we're using that make it extremely strong we use the determinate torsion box we're actually creating something that's two or three times stronger than a traditional stick frame build so it's what I would call digital architecture or a digital construction so every single parts cut on the machine and snap together like a puzzle so if somebody was to look at that from a code standpoint they would say it doesn't fit the mold but that's what we're trying to push you're trying to push something different Hey okay it's just a factory with a bunch of people doing a bunch of different things so it's nice nobody bothers us we're just off on our little corner and we can work away it's like it's like a little just like the bunkie it's small you really don't need a whole lot if you use digital fabrication so this is a three access CNC router they're common everywhere these have been around for 30 almost 40 years it's like a really really great tool and even producing furniture and things for stores and other manufacturers out of here yeah these are some projects that I've learned a lot about joinery over the years this is something that I'm going to bring back but it's a central hub so the back and the leg and the seat all connect in the middle as opposed to in a traditional sense so I've done a lot of experimenting with a joinery to kind of get to where we are now so this is another example of joinery overlapping components and using some traditional aspects and then blending them together so this is part of what inspired how the bunkie works so you would press that in place clamp it and glue it and that creates a really strong corner joint this is the bunkie structure the next one that we're going to be building right now so it's all designed in CAD all the tolerances and all the the joinery and everything is predetermined and then these parts are all flattened out into sub assemblies these are smaller chunks of the bunkie itself and that's what we do here we take all these individual parts and we knit them together we use glue and staples and then we create these parts and that's what we put on in the pallets and that's what gets shipped to the site and then we were able to assemble those all together so it's just like building furniture that I would so I do a lot of furniture that is upholstered like that chair in the corner there and I'm using all the same materials that I would but on a larger scale so you put glue and then you bring them together like that so they're little staples but all it really does is allow the plywood to stay in place until the glue bond is there and that's the strength so this is the notch right here and this is the tab what makes it interesting is the notches and the tabs and how everything interlocks like a big puzzle that adds to the strength and it also prevents error there's only really one way that you can put the parts in as long as you follow the drawings and look at the numbers over here as well you have these overlap joints so you'll have another part that will come into place with holes as well and an overlap and then bolt through one another so you have the strength of different surfaces butting up against one another and then lap joints so that's another big part of what makes this really strong so there's lap joints to strengthen the corners and then wherever these sections come together there's bolts all here's those little cutaways in the drawing that's where you can reach in and actually bolt so everything is bolted together ideally you work in the linear way you put the floors together then you put the walls together and then you put one roof one the next one another and everything bolts to itself typically you'll have a stud frame built and then they'll add the sheathing to the outside so a lot of the strength is in the stud but in this case a lot of the strength also comes from the sheathing because the tab that's locked into the notch allows strength and stress to be distributed throughout the entire structure that's what creates what I again was calling a torsion box in a really really strong structure [Applause] so this gives you another idea of what it is it's not like a people say like a tinker toy or Lego I mean you can use those as references but we designed the connection each time so it's not necessarily a Lego in a sense of it being linear like stacking but it's the the puzzle like nature of it and how it locks in with one another so the tabs and the notches so when it's a really high tolerance and the parts are cut correctly and they fit into one another these joints create super strong joints you can see where the notches in the and the tabs are still right there so you see the similarities in this and you can also see the similarities and the bunkie construction as well so you're utilizing different aspects of the structure to create support or otherwise you work if you're looking at structure everywhere from the sheathing to the interior panels even the inside panels they have those details in them and they're pushed up onto the wall and screwed in so they also create strength so the idea is you want you want the bug baby something together on our own yes but I wouldn't say if you had never ever touched a wrench that you should go ahead and put a bunky together even just based on the scale from what I've learned you still need somebody who has some building knowledge ultimately I think people still want turnkey here but to get it to the next level where you could literally put it together as easy as IKEA furniture I just think the scale of anything that you're gonna live inside is a little bit too risky for that because anything can happen right ideally what I would like to do with this is find those other individuals that have seen it we've done over the last five years and realize that it's working very well and create those little manufacturing hubs just base simple little spaces that are self-sustaining make decent margins and are able to create real products in North America that's what I want so this one is the premiere this is the first one that we launched with and we're having fun with it in creating sort of a conic look we had the chimney integrated into the design and it was a really complex you know design or engineering problem you can't really do that with a thick stick build because of the angles and the changes but you can do it with that overlapping plywood joinery so it was a way to showcase and start the company this was the original idea it was to have nothing obscured under sight lines if you had a cottage and there's not a whole lot of room and you wanted to put a bunk house you could put it between you and the water because this wouldn't be an obstruction per se so the more we built this one the more people were saying well we really love that we would prefer to have a bit more privacy it was almost so we started adding the back wall in and then this became no ninety percent of what we sell because of the square-like nature of it this feels cozier so now we've found our sweet spot so we went through this evolution of designing something really cool that got people's attention and then something more practical and functional that's probably 80% of what people ask us about because they want to try to make it a tiny house and that's in that realm you can't really here no because if it's a no permit space in Canada you're not technically supposed to put plumbing in it but in the u.s. you can do that you can do up to 200 square feet I think this the rules are based on well they don't really want people living in them so this one required a permit it's essentially an extended version it's about 300 square feet but the same footing the same foundation but it had a two by six structure that we made sort of like a hybrid between what we're doing and what traditional contractor would do on-site so if this is still technically called prefab because we prefabricated in this shop but we don't tend to do too many of those it becomes a lot more expensive because of the permanent raids and then the change once you start padding everything to it it becomes expensive just like a house and again people think prefab and they want a very finite fixed cost which is fine because you could do that but this changes everything so we really stuck to this blueprint which is these models this is our standing seam steel that's custom-made for us it's roll formed there's you know 1215 different colors and we have each one of these panels attached with clips so you start from the top you screw these clips maybe five per Section five on the roof five on the wall screw them down and you put the panel in place and then you put the caps on top here and then you put another panel in and then the caps on top and then so on and so forth all the way to the end and to give that really clean look those clips have barbed teeth on the other side and we use these seam caps and they just hammer on top and it covers everything off so you have no exposed fasteners or anything which gives it a really nice look there's definitely customization that we brought to the Murphy bed but we'd like to buy as many things as we can like this curtain wall is available all over the world this type of metal cladding is things that can be fabricated in California or Australia or in Toronto the ideas as a blueprint could be transported in different places this is actually a modular system so you can you can mix and match so there you can have you know this open shelf and all four zones here or you could have this half door bottom and top or this could be all open or this could be a TV that's where we customize we keep the shell the same and we use the same materials but we do offer that as a customization the walls the bed and the furniture is all made from the same material even when we build these we use the same piece of plywood so you can still get the same vein line through the plywood and we love C or a B grade plywood it's usually used for the interior of kitchen cabinets but it has all this crazy warming nature's and knots and vane lines and things that we love because it's more authentic to what real wood is and we do have some of these little screws showing because this is a modular building so if for some reason this gets damaged or the wall gets damaged you can take these out and put them back in because this is a product that gets bolted together that you still see that this is an example of the types of projects that we're getting into now where you have you know one two three or four different bunkies in a like a pod like setting because we were talking about not really being able to have running water or or toilets in there so the idea is you have your main service building where you have your kitchen in your bathroom and any of the utilities and then people can go off and stay in their own little sort of private area and this is part of that glamping phenomenon that's really taking a whole because I think with a connected environment and the constant environment of emails and work people more and more now and maybe the slightly younger generation is looking to completely disconnect whenever possible so we're finding a lot of traction in this market stats Canada that's a read for me yeah I mean a lot of this is us no it's not to sound unprofessional but is us having fun to Amin this is something that we started in our part time just wanted to do what we wanted to do how we wanted to do it so that's probably what I love about it the most

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